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Just-in-time and just-in-place deadlock resolution

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TitleInfo
Title
Just-in-time and just-in-place deadlock resolution
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zeng
NamePart (type = given)
Fancong
DisplayForm
Fancong Zeng
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author
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Littman
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Michael
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Advisory Committee
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Michael Littman
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chair
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Steinberg
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Louis
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Advisory Committee
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Louis Steinberg
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Paull
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Marvin
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Advisory Committee
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Marvin Paull
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
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Levine
NamePart (type = given)
Gertrude
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Gertrude Levine
Role
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outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School-New Brunswick
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
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Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2007
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2007
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = marcform)
electronic
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application/pdf
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x, 82 pages
Abstract (type = abstract)
Deadlocked threads cannot make further progress, and frequently tie up resources requested by still other threads, causing more and more threads to come to a standstill. Thus, a deadlock should not remain undetected and uncorrected for a long time. If deadlock-detection processes are run too frequently, however, valuable system resources may be wasted. Therefore, it is important to choose the right interval between successive deadlock detections.
Deadlock recovery must follow deadlock detection to release held resources in the cyclic wait. In addition to restarting the entire system, it
is desirable that programmers be able to implement fine-grained recovery actions such as releasing a resource currently not in use.
Such fine-grained recovery actions often require the knowledge of program contexts and deadlock states. Unfortunately, modern programming languages lack language-level support for signaling deadlock conditions and for structuring resolution code.
My thesis is that, under the assumption that the time to the first deadlock in the system (after a system restart) follows an exponential distribution, a reinforcement-learning approach is effective in scheduling deadlock detection for a restart-oriented system, and that runtime exceptions are a programming abstraction that allows programmers to write fine-grained deadlock recovery code.
My approach to deadlock-detection scheduling as reinforcement learning estimates the deadlock rate and then performs an optimization to find the detection interval that maximizes system utility. It is theoretically proved that this technique finds the best tradeoff, and experimental results suggest that it is a reasonable approximation to assume that the time to the first deadlock in the system (after a system restart) follows an exponential distribution.
It is natural to consider deadlock occurrences as runtime exceptions because at runtime it is relatively easy to detect actual deadlock occurrences, which represent not only abnormal states but also fatal errors. Thus, exception handlers can be used to resolve deadlock occurrences based on deadlock states and program contexts. Furthermore, because exceptions are a widely used language concept, the technique of deadlock resolution via exceptions is intuitive and practical.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 78-81).
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Computer Science
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Discrete-time systems
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
System design
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.13842
Identifier
ETD_209
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3SX6DPR
Location
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NjNbRU
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
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Name
Fancong Zeng
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School-New Brunswick
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Non-exclusive ETD license
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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