Staff View
Water quality design storms for stormwater hydrodynamic separators

Descriptive

TitleInfo (displayLabel = Citation Title); (type = uniform)
Title
Water quality design storms for stormwater hydrodynamic separators
Name (ID = NAME001); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fernandez
NamePart (type = given)
Victoria Julia
DisplayForm
Victoria Julia Fernandez
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RUETD)
author
Name (ID = NAME002); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Guo
NamePart (type = given)
Qizhong
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Qizhong Guo
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (ID = NAME003); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Medlar
NamePart (type = given)
Steven
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Steven Medlar
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (ID = NAME004); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yook-Kong
NamePart (type = given)
Yong
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Yong Yook-Kong
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (ID = NAME005); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME006); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2008
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2008-05
Language
LanguageTerm
English
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = marcform)
electronic
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xii, 80 pages
Abstract
Stormwater runoff has become an important source of non-point pollution for surface waters. Management practices such as the installation of hydrodynamic separators are implemented in order to treat the stormwater runoff. In New Jersey, the efficiency of these devices is verified and certified by NJCAT and NJDEP, respectively. When the measure of the device performance is based on laboratory data, NJCAT calculates the average annual removal efficiency using weighting factors. The weighting factors were developed by NJDEP based on the average annual distribution of runoff volumes and the assumed similarity with the distribution of runoff peak flow rates. In this study, 10 years of precipitation records were used to evaluate the frequency distributions of the runoff volumes as well as the runoff peak flow rates. USEPA's SWMM model was used to simulate the runoff events produced by the given precipitation events. From the model results, three sets of weighting factors were determined. The first was based on the runoff volume frequency distribution expressed as percentage of the volume produced by the water quality design storm (uniform or non-uniform). The second was based on the runoff peak flow rates frequency distribution expressed as percentage of the peak flow rate generated by the uniformly distributed water quality design storm. The third was also based on the runoff peak flow rates frequency distribution, but expressed as percentage of the peak flow generated by the non-uniformly distributed water quality design storm. The results indicate that the weighting factors, based on the peak runoff rates generated from the uniform design storm, are the closest to the NJDEP weighting factors.
The impact of two different water quality design storms, uniform vs. non-uniform distribution, on the sizing of a certified hydrodynamic separator was also evaluated. One sets the design flow rate of the device equal to the peak flow rate generated by the uniform design storm. The other sets the design flow rate of the device equal to the peak flow rate generated by the non-uniform design storm. USEPA's SWMM model was used to continuously simulate solids loading to the treatment device. The lab-measured relationship between flow rate and removal efficiency was used to specify the removal rate of solids within the storm event. The results indicate that sizing with the uniform design storm would achieve a removal efficiency close to the one verified but that sizing with the non-uniform storm would achieve a removal efficiency significantly higher than the one verified.
It is concluded that setting design flow rate equal to the peak flow rate generated by the uniform water quality design storm is more consistent with use of the existing weight factors in calculating the average annual solids removal efficiency. Use of the non-uniform water quality design storm is too conservative.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 79-80).
Subject (ID = SUBJ1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Subject (ID = SUBJ2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Water quality management
Subject (ID = SUBJ3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Storm sewers
Subject (ID = SUBJ4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Hydraulic measurements
Subject (ID = SUBJ5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Separators (Machines)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17305
Identifier
ETD_948
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3PN960R
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
AssociatedEntity (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Name
Victoria Fernandez
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
RightsEvent (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
Permission or license
Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
AssociatedObject (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Back to the top

Technical

Format (TYPE = mime); (VERSION = )
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1403904
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
53d336693e7395a54aa1cc571f3670a4145d1db5
ContentModel
ETD
CompressionScheme
other
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Format (TYPE = mime); (VERSION = NULL)
application/x-tar
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021