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The great powers and the establishment of security regimes:

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
The great powers and the establishment of security regimes:
SubTitle
the formation of the Concert of Europe, 1792-1815
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17424
Identifier
ETD_1150
Language
LanguageTerm
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Political Science
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
National security--Europe
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Security, International
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Europe--Politics and government--1789-1815
Abstract
Over the past two centuries, international relations have been marked by greater institutionalization. This trend has characterized not only trade and economic relations but also such highly sensitive areas as security and political-military cooperation among states. The institutionalization of security issues by means of establishing global and regional security organizations, such as the UN and NATO, or issue-specific security regimes, such as the non-proliferation regime, raises important questions about the changing nature of international relations. Why do states cooperate to establish international security regimes in the first place? Why do they succeed in establishing security regimes in some cases and fail in others?
In my dissertation I addresses these questions by studying several attempts made by the great powers between 1792 and 1815 to form an early case of a security regime, known as the Concert of Europe. As an example of successful great power cooperation in security issues, the study of the Concert has recently acquired a great deal of political as well as academic importance, leading to the emergence of substantial scholarship among historians and political scientists. The literature on the Concert is abundant, however, it suffers from a major weakness: it offers bivariate explanations of regime formation, emphasizing either power, interests or knowledge as the key variable. The same weakness characterizes the regime scholarship in general. I redress these weaknesses in the scholarship by using a multivariate approach to the study of the formation of the Concert. I focus on the interplay of four key factors -- power, interests, knowledge and leadership in the creation of the European Concert.
I do not treat the formation of the Concert of Europe as a single case study. The formation of the Concert constitutes a series of mini-cases and thus may be viewed as a small-N study. Between 1792 and 1815 the great powers went through several rounds of negotiations over the creation of a European concert, which corresponded to the formation of several anti-French coalitions. The Second and the Third Coalitions represent cases of failure to form a European concert, while the Grand Coalition (1814-1815) is a clear-cut case of success.
The findings reached on the basis of all four case-studies are numerous and shed new light on the relative role played by the key major factors -- power, interests, knowledge and leadership in the creation of security regimes. As a theory-generating small-N study, the findings of the dissertation may be tested in other cases of security regime formation such as the creation of the League of Nations (1919) or the United Nations (1945).
PhysicalDescription
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vi, 241 pages
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 226-240).
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Akopian
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Regina
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Regina Akopian
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Shafer
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Michael
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Michael Shafer
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Kubik
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Jan
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Jan Kubik
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Waterman
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Harvey
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Advisory Committee
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Harvey Waterman
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McCartney
NamePart (type = given)
Paul
Role
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Paul McCartney
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2008
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2008-10
Location
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NjNbRU
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3HM58TX
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
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Name
Regina Akopian
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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