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The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication

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Title
The necessity of inspiration and the crisis of modern political communication
Name (ID = NAME001); (type = personal)
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Hoerl
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Alexandra Elizabeth
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Alexandra Elizabeth Hoerl
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author
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Schochet
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Gordon J.
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Advisory Committee
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Gordon J. Schochet
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chair
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Bathory
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Peter Dennis
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Advisory Committee
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Peter Dennis Bathory
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Bronner
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Stephen Eric
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Advisory Committee
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Stephen Eric Bronner
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Takacs
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Sarolta A.
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Advisory Committee
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Sarolta A. Takacs
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outside member
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Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Text
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theses
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2008
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2008-10
Language
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English
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electronic
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application/pdf
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ix, 263 pages
Abstract
My dissertation seeks to fully recover one of the most important elements of republicanism--and yet an element of republicanism that is overlooked in most of the literature--persuasive political rhetoric ("rhetoric-as-movere") in order to improve political communication and participation in the United States. Through rhetoric-as-movere is not without its problems, I argue that it has two major advantages over the type of political communication necessitated by strict deliberative democracy, a type of political communication that I suggest is rooted in "rhetoric-as-docere," a tradition that developed alongside the rise of scientific empiricism in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: it is better at drawing out action from novice citizens because it does a better job than deliberative democracy of dealing with the barriers to political entry, and it is more inclusive. Rhetoric-as-movere allows an orator to explicitly make use of all the persuasive tools at his or her disposal. While it is true that these tools are at times contrary to "rationality," throughout history they have always been the first recourse of leaders and movements truly concerned with popular participation. I demonstrate this affinity between rhetoric-as-movere and popular participation through an historical survey of movements ranging from 14th century English peasant revolts to 20th century American civil rights movements. I also analyze the development of the rhetoric-as-docere tradition in thinkers like Hobbes, Smith and Hume. I conclude that the rhetoric-as-docere tradition, which includes contemporary deliberative democracy, is predicated upon a suspicion of popular action that renders it insufficient as a model of political communication.
Finally, I create a multi-level model of political communication that incorporates rhetoric-as-movere and the republican ethos of civic education as well as certain aspects of deliberative democratic theory and rhetoric-as-docere. Most importantly, I contribute a curriculum of rhetorical education that rehabilitates persuasion and teaches students about the three classical proofs of logos, pathos and ethos as well as modern empirical proofs. Both of the model of political communication and the educational curriculum are crucial for the necessary and proper recovery of rhetoric-as-movere and the improvement of political participation in the United States.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 242-262).
Subject (ID = SUBJ1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Political Science
Subject (ID = SUBJ2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Communication in politics
Subject (ID = SUBJ3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Rhetoric--Political aspects
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Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
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http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17492
Identifier
ETD_1242
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T31V5F9B
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
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Open
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Name
Alexandra Hoerl
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Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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