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An in-situ study of organic semiconductor thin films for gas sensing

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TitleInfo (displayLabel = Citation Title); (type = uniform)
Title
An in-situ study of organic semiconductor thin films for gas sensing
Name (ID = NAME001); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stokes
NamePart (type = given)
Melissa A.
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Melissa A. Stokes
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author
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Chabal
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Yves
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Yves J Chabal
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Boustany
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Nada
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Nada N Boustany
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internal member
Name (ID = NAME004); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Garfunkel
NamePart (type = given)
Eric
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Eric L Garfunkel
Role
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outside member
Name (ID = NAME005); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Podzorov
NamePart (type = given)
Vitaly
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Vitaly Podzorov
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (ID = NAME006); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME007); (type = corporate)
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2008
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2008-10
Language
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English
PhysicalDescription
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electronic
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
xv, 227 pages
Abstract
Organic semiconductors are an attractive platform for developing chemisensors, because of their customizable surface chemistry. An understanding of the sensing mechanism would help develop surface chemistry design for molecular recognition. We have studied the steric and chemical effects of acetone and ethanol on sublimated and spun organic films, which are used as chemisensor transducers.
We designed deposition and exposure systems to study the surface current and chemistry of rubrene, pentacene, and 5,5'-bis(4-hydroxyhexylphenyl)-2,2'-bithiophene (C6) in response to acetone and ethanol vapors. A rubrene crystal and spun film, as well as sublimated C6 and pentacene films and transistors were exposed under vacuum to saturated vapor pressure acetone gas. The surface current was recorded in real-time, while the infrared absorption (IRAS) signature of the acetone film effect was recorded in-situ.
Some chemical interaction between acetone and the organic substrate was observed, and led to the use of saturated alkyl perfluorinated trichlorosilane (FTS) monolayer coverage of rubrene to prevent acetone degradation and removal of an amorphous spun rubrene film. Acetone removed only 1.5% of the FTS film from saturated coverage, physisorbed multilayers of FTS on rubrene. Besides this small chemical effect, the main effect on the sensor current is due to the physisorption of acetone itself.
In the cases of pentacene and C6 sublimated films, the surface chemistry and surface current could both be measured on the same film. Acetone intercalation into pentacene and C6 sublimated films perturbed the out-of-plane C-H bending, possibly due to steric interaction. An irreversible reduction in surface current and carrier mobility was found. Acetone caused the thickest pentacene thin film tested (1500 Å) to produce the highest intensity differential peaks, similar to the effect of cooling the film by 3°C - 7°C. However, cooling did not fully account for transistor current reduction. Also, the surface chemistry response decreased upon reuse, and the surface current was not quantitatively reproducible. This behavior may be explained by the fact that the contact adhesive was soluble in acetone. Less surface chemical change occurred for ethanol than for acetone exposures, despite the fact that the C6 molecule has a more reactive hydroxy-hexanol termination.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references.
Subject (ID = SUBJ1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biomedical Engineering
Subject (ID = SUBJ2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Organic semiconductors
Subject (ID = SUBJ3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Thin films
Subject (ID = SUBJ4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Gas detectors
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.17577
Identifier
ETD_1196
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3CN7462
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
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Name
Melissa Stokes
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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