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Shepherding in greener pastures

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Shepherding in greener pastures
SubTitle
causes and consequences of the dual transition of celibate Catholic priests into married Protestant ministry
TitleInfo (ID = T-2); (type = alternative)
Title
Causes and consequences of the dual transition of celibate
Identifier
ETD_1416
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000050513
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Sociology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Catholic Church--Clergy
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Protestant churches--Clergy
Abstract
Since the late 1960s, roughly one-quarter of Roman Catholic priests in America have resigned, motivated mainly by a desire to marry. While several sociologists (e.g., Fichter, Greeley, Hoge, and Schoenherr) have studied the motivations and actions of resigned priests (who usually maintain their Catholic identity and take up some form of non-pastoral employment after their transition), this research seeks to describe a never-before-studied subgroup that chose to re-focus their lives towards Protestant ministry. The research offices of the five mainline Protestant Churches (Congregational, Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist, Presbyterian) identified 414 such ministers, of whom 32 percent chose to participate. All 133 respondents completed a 12-page survey either by anonymous return mail or during a telephone or a face-to-face interview.
The analysis plan, designed to answer the four research questions (outlined below), consisted of three parts: 1) a detailed reporting on the frequencies of the principal variables, 2) a series of cross-tabulations, and 3) several multivariate regression models.
The first major finding confirmed that marriage was their main motivator. The distinction between those who followed their "heart" as opposed to those who followed their "head," highlighted the fact that both emotion and intellect had a role to play. Although one could get the impression (by listening to their retrospective narratives only) that both head and heart had equal "pull," analyzing their concrete actions revealed that most followed their hearts first by marrying before switching affiliation. Results from the second research question revealed a definite period effect that can be traced back to the conclusion of the Second Vatican Council.
The third line of inquiry verified the link between parental support for the transition and current levels of satisfaction, with the added nuance that such a correlation is stronger among former diocesan priests than it is among religious priests. Finally, results from the fourth research question support the hypothesis that the obligations of marriage limit the number of hours that a minister can dedicate to his flock. These "greener pastures shepherds" follow a work schedule that is more similar to their current denomination's average than it is to the Catholic priest model.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xii, 212 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 203-211)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Stephen Joseph Fichter
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fichter
NamePart (type = given)
Stephen Joseph
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author
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Stephen Joseph Fichter
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Idler
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Ellen
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Ellen L Idler
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NamePart (type = family)
Zablocki
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Benjamin
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Benjamin D Zablocki
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zerubavel
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Eviatar
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Eviatar Zerubavel
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Greeley
NamePart (type = given)
Andrew
Role
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Andrew M Greeley
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Location
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NjNbRU
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZS2WSJ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
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Type
Permission or license
Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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