Staff View
Management practices, environment, and spray adjuvants influence efficacy and metabolism of bispyribac-sodium in turfgrass

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Management practices, environment, and spray adjuvants influence efficacy and metabolism of bispyribac-sodium in turfgrass
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier
ETD_1375
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051048
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Plant Biology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Turf management
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Turfgrasses
Abstract
Bispyribac-sodium has shown potential for selective annual and roughstalk bluegrass control in cool-season turfgrasses but further research is needed for successful integration in to turf management programs. The objectives of this research were to investigate the influence of management practices, environment, and spray adjuvants on efficacy and metabolism of bispyribac-sodium in turfgrass.
In field experiments, sequential bispyribac-sodium applications controlled annual bluegrass 93% but trinexapac-ethyl did not affect efficacy. Tank mixing trinexapac-ethyl with bispyribac-sodium provided similar annual bluegrass control to the herbicide alone. In field experiments, withholding nitrogen increased annual bluegrass and creeping bentgrass sensitivity to bispyribac-sodium while grasses fertilized biweekly generally had darker color. Weekly nitrogen treatments increased 14C-bispyribac-sodium metabolism in both grasses compared to the unfertilized.
In field experiments, discoloration of creeping bentgrass putting greens was greatest from applications of 37 g/ha every ten days compared to 74, 148, or 298 g/ha applied less frequently. Chelated iron effectively masked discoloration of creeping bentgrass putting greens from bispyribac-sodium while trinexapac-ethyl inconsistently masked these effects. In field experiments, bispyribac-sodium regimes totaling 148, 222, and 296 g/ha controlled annual bluegrass 81, 83, and 91%, respectively, over two years. Pooled over herbicide rates, bispyribac-sodium applied two, three, and six times controlled annual bluegrass 78, 83, and 94%, respectively. Bispyribac-sodium and sulfosulfuron provided substantial reductions (80 to 100%) in roughstalk bluegrass cover in creeping bentgrass fairways by late July but regrowth was detected by October in three years suggesting herbicide applications did not control vegetative stems or crowns.
In growth chamber experiments, annual bluegrass chlorosis and clipping reductions from bispyribac-sodium were exacerbated by increased temperature from 10 to 30° C. Conversely, creeping bentgrass was most sensitive to bispyribac-sodium at 10° C but chlorosis and clipping reductions were less substantial at 20 and 30°. Spray adjuvants increased 14C-bispyribac-sodium foliar absorption by two to threefold in laboratory experiments and improved annual bluegrass control in field experiments by 25 to 50% from treatments with no adjuvants. In metabolism experiments, half life of 14C-bispyribac-sodium in annual bluegrass, creeping bentgrass, and perennial ryegrass was estimated at greater than seven days, one day, and two days, respectively.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xiii, 162 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references.
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Patrick Edgeworth McCullough
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McCullough
NamePart (type = given)
Patrick Edgeworth
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
author
DisplayForm
Patrick Edgeworth McCullough
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hart
NamePart (type = given)
Steve
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Steve Hart
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Murphy
NamePart (type = given)
Jim
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Jim Murphy
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Huang
NamePart (type = given)
Bingru
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Bingru Huang
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hurley
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Richard Hurley
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-01
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg)
NjNbRU
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3X34XP5
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
RightsEvent (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
Permission or license
Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
AssociatedObject (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Back to the top

Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
849920
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
7655536aa3b958b18227cd90bcba9b77293e8482
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021