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The ecology and the biological control of the annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: curculionidae) using entomopathogenic nematodes (rhabditida: steinernematidae and heterorhabditidae)

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
The ecology and the biological control of the annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: curculionidae) using entomopathogenic nematodes (rhabditida: steinernematidae and heterorhabditidae)
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier
ETD_1366
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051051
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Entomology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Turfgrasses--Diseases and pests
Abstract
The annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis Kirby, is a highly destructive insect pest of fine turfgrass in the northeastern United States and eastern Canadian provinces. I examined the spatial ecology of L. maculicollis and assessed the virulence of endemic and released entomopathogenic nematodes to weevil stages to develop ecologically based control programs. Endemic populations of Steinernema carpocapsae Weiser and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar infected a range of weevil instars and caused moderate generational mortality. The variability in seasonal abundance of endemic nematode populations and the variability in weevil generational mortality suggests an inability for reliable pest population regulation. Laboratory bioassays demonstrated that L. maculicollis fourth- and fifth-instar larvae were moderately to highly susceptible to nematode infection. Several species of nematodes significantly reduced densities of both instars, although a decrease in susceptibility to nematodes was observed as the insect aged. No difference was observed between the virulence of endemic and commercial nematode strains to any L. maculicollis stage tested. Field trials conducted over a three year period demonstrated great variability in the ability of commercial and endemic nematodes applied at standard field concentrations to reduce L. maculicollis densities below damage thresholds. Many factors, including nematode concentration, weevil spatial distribution and density, and timing of application are believed to have contributed to the variability in control.
The spatio-temporal distribution of emerging overwintering adult populations, first generation larvae and the distribution of host plants were examined to identify the spatial structure of populations, better target curative controls and develop monitoring programs. Significant aggregations of cumulative adult captures, larvae and their preferred hosts (Poa annua L.) were found on fairway edges when the entire width of fairways was sampled. Adult distribution rarely coincided with the following week's spatial pattern, suggesting that adults actively disperse across fairways throughout the oviposition period. Spatial association was detected between adults and larvae, but rarely between either stage and P. annua. The findings challenge assumptions of L. maculicollis host preference, but suggest a potential for targeting controls. The data were used to develop sequential sampling programs to rapidly assess adult densities and estimate the threat of larval damage.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
xvii, 165 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 152-164)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Benjamin Alexander McGraw
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McGraw
NamePart (type = given)
Benjamin Alexander
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author
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Benjamin Alexander McGraw
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Koppenhofer
NamePart (type = given)
Albrecht
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Albrecht Koppenhofer
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hamilton
NamePart (type = given)
George
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
George Hamilton
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lashomb
NamePart (type = given)
James
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
James Lashomb
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Clarke
NamePart (type = given)
Bruce
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Bruce Clarke
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-01
Location
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NjNbRU
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T39C6XP3
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Copyright
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Availability
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Open
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Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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application/x-tar
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