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Still, W[illia]m, letter, 31 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia, August 7, 1850, to [James O? Cousins, Cincinnati, Ohio]

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Still, W[illia]m, letter, 31 North Fifth Street, Philadelphia, August 7, 1850, to [James O? Cousins, Cincinnati, Ohio]
TitleInfo (type = alternative)
Title
Letter, William Still describing his meeting with his brother Peter. Philadelphia, August 7, 1850.
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore00000002022.Manuscript.000051244
Genre (authority = lcsh)
Correspondence
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Still, Peter, b. 1801
Abstract
William Still relates the story of Peter Freedman [Peter Still] coming to William Still's office in Philadelphia to learn how to locate relatives; notes the writer's realization and amazement that Peter was one of his "long absent brothers"; and states that Peter has thus located various family members: his mother, five brothers and three sisters. This item is labeled in ink as if addressed to "Peter Freedman," with an added notation in pencil regarding its transmittal to Cousins.
PhysicalDescription
Extent (unit = page(s))
3 p.
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Cousins
NamePart (type = given)
James O.
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Still
NamePart (type = given)
William
NamePart (type = date)
1821-1902
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrelator); (type = text)
Creator
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = iso8601); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
1850-08-07
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (type = text)
Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives.
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg)
NjRV
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Peter Still papers, 1850-1875
Identifier (type = local)
rucore00000002022
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Digital exhibition
Label
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civi War
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Perrone, Fernanda
AssociatedEntity
Role
Project manager
Name
Radick, Caryn
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Council for the Humanities
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
African Americans in New Jersey before the Civil War
Detail
A large and vibrant African-American community lived in New Jersey before the Civil War. On the eve of the conflict, the black population was 25, 336 out of a total of 646,699. Years after the abolition of slavery, African Americans still lacked legal and political rights. The new state constitution of 1844 restricted voting to white male citizens. African Americans in New Jersey also faced poverty, job discrimination, and racism. The Fugitive Slave Bill subjected escapees from the South to deportation. During the tense period leading up to the conflict, African-American community leaders emerged to play important roles in the abolition movement and the Underground Railroad.
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Relationship
Describes
Detail
Born a slave in Maryland in 1801, Peter Still was later sold to an Alabama slaveholder. By 1850, he had accumulated enough money to purchase his own freedom and head north, but he had to leave his wife, Vina, and children behind. In Philadelphia, he visited the Anti-Slavery Office in the hope of locating his parents and relatives, who years before had escaped to New Jersey. To his surprise, the clerk in the office was his brother William Still. In this letter from William Still describes their meeting: “my feelings became unutterable.”
AssociatedObject
Type
Placement in digital exhibition
Name
2
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T36110JV
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = RULIB); (ID = rulibRdec0002)
This object may be copyright protected. You may make use of this resource under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 3.0 Unported license (see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). For any use not specifically declared under this license, please contact the rights holder for permission for further use.
Copyright
Status
Public domain
Availability
Status
Open
Publication
Status
Unpublished
RightsHolder (ID = CRH-1); (type = corporate)
Name
Rutgers University Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives.
Role
Archive or repository
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Source

Shelving
Locator (TYPE = Call number)
MC 1392
SourceTechnical
SourceType
Text or graphic (paper)
Format
Manuscript
Extent (Unit = page(s))
3
ProvenanceEvent
Type
Exhibition
Label
Struggle Without End: The Civil War in New Jersey
Place
Special Collections and University Archives Gallery and Gallery 50
DateTime (encoding = iso8601); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2012-09-19
DateTime (encoding = iso8601); (point = end); (qualifier = exact)
2013-08-31
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Is part of
Name
African Americans in New Jersey before the Civil War
Detail
A large and vibrant African-American community lived in New Jersey before the Civil War. On the eve of the conflict, the black population was 25, 336 out of a total of 646,699. Years after the abolition of slavery, African Americans still lacked legal and political rights. The new state constitution of 1844 restricted voting to white male citizens. African Americans in New Jersey also faced poverty, job discrimination, and racism. The Fugitive Slave Bill subjected escapees from the South to deportation. During the tense period leading up to the conflict, African-American community leaders emerged to play important roles in the abolition movement and the Underground Railroad.
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Detail
Letter, William Still describing his meeting with his brother Peter. Philadelphia, August 7, 1850. Peter Still Papers Born a slave in Maryland in 1801, Peter Still was later sold to an Alabama slaveholder. By 1850, he had accumulated enough money to purchase his own freedom and head north, but he had to leave his wife, Vina, and children behind. In Philadelphia, he visited the Anti-Slavery Office in the hope of locating his parents and relatives, who years before had escaped to New Jersey. To his surprise, the clerk in the office was his brother William Still. In this letter from Rutgers’ Peter Still Papers, William Still describes their meeting: “my feelings became unutterable.”
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Technical

ContentModel
Manuscript
PreservationLevel
full
OperatingSystem
Windows XP
CreatingApplication
Adobe Photoshop CS3
GeneralCaptureInformation
Scanner
Manufacturer
Epson Perfection V300 PHOTO
MimeType (TYPE = file)
image/tiff
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
192778240
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
9b6b7e779a33f45fa626612ffb7c1e37d244ce03
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