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Science, technology and utopias in the work of contemporary women artists

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Science, technology and utopias in the work of contemporary women artists
Identifier
ETD_1705
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051344
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Aycock, Alice--Criticism and interpretation
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Denes, Agnes--Criticism and interpretation
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Rosler, Martha--Criticism and interpretation
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Schneemann, Carolee, 1939- --Criticism and interpretation
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Art History
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Science in art
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Technology in art
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Utopias in art
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Women artists
Abstract
This dissertation examines the work of artists Alice Aycock, Agnes Denes, Martha Rosler and Carolee Schneemann, created between the late 1960s and the mid-1980s, which incorporated science and technology as subject and media. It represents the first focused examination of the conceptual use of science and technology by American women artists during the Cold War. I argue that, for these artists, science and technology represented a realm of investigation replete with negative associations in the wake of the Vietnam War, but also ripe with opportunities for change. Motivated by the contemporary American women's movement, these artists leveraged theories in physics, cosmology and systems, as well as new technologies such as video, in order to subvert modernist, male-centered, heroic, painterly styles, in addition to the traditional economic structures of the gallery, museum and dealer. This study sheds new light on conceptual art by re-centering the use of technology, generally treated as a conservative trend and excised from avant-garde histories, as a means for critique of Cold War society and as a method for imagining alternative concepts of human community. At stake in this investigation are domains of knowledge and power from which women have been historically excluded.
Informed by New Left and counter-culture criticism of nuclear weapons and the Vietnam War arising from influential theorists, such as Herbert Marcuse and Lewis Mumford, these artists associated the industries of science and technology with the military-industrial complex, which was reviled as representative of a closed, mechanistic "technological society." However Marcuse, the media-acknowledged guru of the New Left (a left-wing international movement composed of social activist groups formed in the 1960s), also inspired the counter-culture to imagine an alternative society in which "science and technology are the great vehicles of liberation." Thus, while these artists subjected the patriarchal institutions and industries of science and technology to withering attack, they also redeployed their implicit notion of progress in feminist utopian visions of a different future.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xviii, 335 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 304-331)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Christine Filippone
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Filippone
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Christine
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author
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Christine Filippone
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Joan
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Joan Marter
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yanni
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Carla
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Carla Yanni
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sharp
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Jane
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Advisory Committee
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Jane Sharp
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stiles
NamePart (type = given)
Kristine
Role
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outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Kristine Stiles
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38052T2
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
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Permission or license
Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
AssociatedObject (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = end)
2017-06-30
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after June 30, 2017.
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