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Engineer cell growth using a DNA crosslinked hydrogel with static and dynamic stiffnesses

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Engineer cell growth using a DNA crosslinked hydrogel with static and dynamic stiffnesses
Identifier
ETD_1692
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051360
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biomedical Engineering
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Tissue engineering
Abstract
Elucidation of the interactions between cells and extracellular matrices (ECM) is critical to not only the understanding of the basic biology of development, tissue functioning and pathological conditions, but also successful design and implementation of bioscaffolds in tissue engineering applications. Mechanical characteristics, including mechanical stiffness, of the local microenvironment play an important role in cell decision making processes. Aiming at the neural tissue engineering applications, we examined the mechano-sensing of neural cells in the context of neuron-astroglia interactions, and differentiated between dendrites and axons by deploying bis- and DNA-crosslinked hydrogels. These studies revealed the complexity in the neural cell mechano-sensing which is coupled with cell-cell interactions and possesses specificity towards cellular property, cell type and stiffness range.
The dynamic and changing nature of cells' local physiological environment particularly of its mechanical characteristics makes it desirable to develop a cell culture system or bioscaffold whose mechanical properties can be modulated in a controlled and temporal fashion. DNA crosslinked hydrogels offer unique opportunities for modifying mechanical properties of the substrates or scaffolds via DNA delivery during cell culture without changing environmental factors. Two types of fibroblasts, L929 and GFP fibroblasts, and spinal cord cells were subjected to the dynamic alterations in the mechanical stiffness of the DNA gels. It was found that both fibroblasts and neurons are able to sense the mechanical stiffness change. Fibroblasts respond mainly by altering morphology, focal adhesion or cytoskeletal structures whereas neurons respond largely by adjusting neurite outgrowth and adhesion properties.
The significance of the current thesis work includes the following: 1. It highlights the importance of the mechanical aspects of cell-ECM interactions, particularly cellular response to static and dynamic mechanical stiffnesses. 2. It reveals the complexity in the mechano-sensing with specificity towards or dependence on cell type, cellular property and stiffness range. It can be further coupled with cell-cell interactions, and other factors including dimensionality and biological cues. 3. It adds a new dimension, Time, to the mechanical compliance of the substrate in understanding cell-ECM events. 4. It provides design guidelines for the choice of the mechanical stiffness of the bio-scaffold in tissue engineering applications.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xxv, 262 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Xue Jiang
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jiang
NamePart (type = given)
Xue
NamePart (type = date)
1979
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
author
DisplayForm
Xue Jiang
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Langrana
NamePart (type = given)
Noshir
Role
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Noshir A. Langrana
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Firestein
NamePart (type = given)
Bonnie
Role
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Bonnie L. Firestein
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shreiber
NamePart (type = given)
David
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
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Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
David I. Shreiber
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schloss
NamePart (type = given)
Rene
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Rene Schloss
Name (ID = NAME-6); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yurke
NamePart (type = given)
Bernard
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Bernard Yurke
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZP46B5
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
RightsEvent (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
Permission or license
Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
AssociatedObject (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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8632320
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