Staff View
Characterization of landscape-scale habitat use by timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) within the Ridge and Valley and Highlands regions of New Jersey

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Characterization of landscape-scale habitat use by timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) within the Ridge and Valley and Highlands regions of New Jersey
Identifier
ETD_1656
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051396
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Timber rattlesnake--Habitat
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Timber rattlesnake--New Jersey
Abstract
Regulations and a lack of understanding the habitat needs of timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) on a landscape-scale have limited conservation efforts. With better information land managers and planners could implement strategies that protect suitable habitats from development and other human activities. While studies have shown microhabitat characteristics play a role in habitat selection by timber rattlesnakes, it remains unclear if large-scale features, other than rock outcrops, talus slopes and canopy, also impact site selection. I compared the habitat use by two metapopulations of timber rattlesnakes in northern New Jersey with available habitats using GIS data layers to identify the snakes' macrohabitat preferences. The results showed snakes used habitats with slightly more open canopy, closer to rock outcrops, and farther from roads, human development, forest edge (an interface between any habitat and forests with >50% canopy closure) and streams and rivers (>10m wide) than randomly sampled locations. Additionally, I developed a model and distribution map of potential areas where hibernacula may exist in northern New Jersey by first testing habitat and topographic variables to determine the predictors of suitable habitat for hibernacula. In 2004, elevation, sun index, deciduous wetlands and slopes (0-20%) were the most influential features in predicting suitable habitat for hibernacula. Slopes (0-20%) and deciduous wetlands were negatively associated with hibernacula indicating that areas containing shallow slopes and/or deciduous wetlands were less likely to support hibernacula. Sun index indicated that hibernacula are most likely to be found in areas with steep slopes and southerly aspects, and elevation, having the least influence in predicting suitable habitat for hibernacula, showed the likelihood of hibernacula presence increased with increasing elevation. In 2009, with the addition of interior forest hibernacula in the dataset, only slope (0-20%) and sun index were influential features in predicting suitable habitat for hibernacula indicating that the potential for hibernacula presence increased in areas with steep slopes and southerly aspects. Landscape modeling using GIS-ready habitat features can help biologists identify habitats essential for populations and metapopulations, and target conservation of those habitats and connecting corridors for long-term timber rattlesnake viability.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xi, 183 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 178-183)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Kris Alane Schantz
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schantz
NamePart (type = given)
Kris Alane
NamePart (type = date)
1968
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
author
DisplayForm
Kris Alane Schantz
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Burger
NamePart (type = given)
Joanna
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Joanna Burger
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lathrop
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Richard Lathrop
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Green
NamePart (type = given)
Edwin
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Edwin Green
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3JS9QNM
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
RightsEvent (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
Permission or license
Detail
Non-exclusive ETD license
AssociatedObject (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = 1)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Back to the top

Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1331200
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
f7fd4bef359449d2a65dccbb07ded8fbc19dd6ce
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021