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Implicit and explicit memory tests reactivate common memory traces

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Implicit and explicit memory tests reactivate common memory traces
SubTitle
support for a unitary memory system
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_1564
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051304
Language (objectPart = )
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eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Memory
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Memory--Testing
Abstract
The structure of human memory is heatedly debated. While some researchers claim that there are two or more memory systems (Graf & Schacter, 1985; Mitchell & Brown, 1988; Tulving, 1985), others believe that memory is unitary (Bentin et al., 1992; Roediger, 1990). Behavioral and neuroimaging research presented in this dissertation examines a unitary model of human memory using implicit and explicit memory tests for object locations. Specifically, the behavioral experiments tested a) if implicit memory could occur without explicit memory, b) if implicit memory correlated with explicit memory and c) if both tests were equally affected by the strength of memory traces. It appeared that implicit memory for object locations was greater for explicitly recalled, compared to not recalled, items. Implicit memory was correlated with explicit recall. Stronger memory traces were associated with higher recall and higher implicit memory for object locations. The fMRI experiment tested a) if increases in neural activity were related to enhancement of implicit memory and b) re-engagement of encoding-related brain regions during implicit memory test for locations. Consistent with the findings reported in the earlier studies of explicit memory, improvement of implicit memory for locations was associated with increased neural activity in task-specific and attentional networks. In addition, implicit spatial memory depended on the magnitude of reactivation in the encoding-related brain regions. These findings indicated that implicit and explicit memory may rely on similar facilitatory mechanisms. Taken together, behavioral and neuroimaging evidence supported a unitary model of human memory and suggested that both, implicit and explicit, spatial memory tests access common memory representations. It was proposed that reactivation of memory traces is a key factor for performance on implicit and explicit memory tests. Implicit and explicit tests may differ in their ability to reactivate memory representations. This difference may account for dissociation between performance on implicit and explicit memory tests observed in the previous studies.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
xi, 170 p. : ill.
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 100-113)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Anna Manelis
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Manelis
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Anna
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author
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Anna Manelis
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Harber
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Kent
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Kent Harber
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Hansen
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Stephen
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Stephen J. Hansen
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Hansen
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Catherine
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Advisory Committee
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Catherine Hansen
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Delgado
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Mauricio
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Advisory Committee
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Mauricio Delgado
Name (ID = NAME-6); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Poldrack
NamePart (type = given)
Russell
Role
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Russell Poldrack
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
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Graduate School - Newark
Role
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
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xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10002600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3QZ2B5D
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Name
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Manelis
GivenName
Anna
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Copyright holder
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Name
Anna Manelis
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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