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Behavioral and neuroanatomical substrates contributing to motivation in the postpartum female rat

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Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Behavioral and neuroanatomical substrates contributing to motivation in the postpartum female rat
SubTitle
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NonSort
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ETD_1571
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051317
Language (objectPart = )
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eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
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Topic
Integrative Neuroscience
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Topic
Brain stimulation
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Conditioned response
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Rats--Behavior
Abstract
The experiments described in this dissertation characterize the unique motivational state of the postpartum female rat. To effectively protect and care for offspring (pups), postpartum females must be strongly motivated to seek out and interact with pups. A combination of place preference studies, behavioral observations, and neurobiological interventions were used to explore females’ motivational state across the postpartum period.
To challenge postpartum females’ maternal motivation, Chapter 1 presented females with a choice between chambers paired with pups and highly salient cocaine. While most late postpartum females preferred cocaine, many early postpartum females retained striking preference for the pup-paired chamber. To explore whether cocaine’s incentive value changed across the postpartum period, Chapter 2 examined females’ preference for cocaine- versus saline-paired chambers. Across a broad range of drug administration parameters, postpartum females consistently expressed similar, strong preference for the cocaine-paired chamber. Surprisingly, cocaine preference was stronger in postpartum females than virgin females or males. Females’ locomotor response to pup, cocaine, and saline stimuli predicted their preference for those stimuli. Chapter 3 revealed that the length of pup exposure and nature of female-pup interactions can even affect the motivational state of females that have not given birth. Virgin females were exposed to young pups for various lengths of time and then tested for pup-paired chamber preference. Striking pup-paired chamber preference emerged even in virgin females only briefly exposed to pups, matching the preference expressed by strongly motivated postpartum females. Experiments in Chapter 4 revealed that the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a brain region critical to motivated behavior, drives the incentive value of pup but not cocaine stimuli. Postpartum and virgin females were tested for their preference for pup- or cocaine-paired chambers, respectively, after transient VTA inactivation. Pup preference was abolished by VTA inactivation and restored after recovery. Cocaine preference remained intact despite VTA function.
Maternal motivation is resilient to challenge during early postpartum and is at least partially driven by exposure to pups. As the choice of other salient stimuli (e.g., cocaine) during postpartum may jeopardize maternal motivation, females’ motivation to interact proactively with pups is critical to the offsprings’ survival and viability.
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electronic resource
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ix, 219 p. : ill.
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Ph.D.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 203-218)
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by Katharine M. Seip
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Seip
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Katharine M.
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Katharine M. Seip
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Creese
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Ian
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Ian Creese
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Morrell
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Joan
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Joan I Morrell
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Pare
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Denis
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Denis Pare
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Delgado
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Mauricio
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Mauricio Delgado
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Grigson
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Patricia
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Patricia Sue Grigson
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - Newark
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school
OriginInfo
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2009
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2009-05
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xx
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10002600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38W3DHC
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Notice
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Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Seip
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Katharine
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Katharine Seip
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Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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