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Technogeopolitics of militarization and security in cyberspace

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Technogeopolitics of militarization and security in cyberspace
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_1819
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051321
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Global Affairs
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Transborder data flow
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Data protection
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Privacy, Right of
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Internet
Subject (ID = SBJ-6); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Cyberspace
Abstract
Based on democratic principles that encourage creation and transmission of information and knowledge using information and communication technologies, the Information Society has become the organizing paradigm for a digital age. Humans residing in digital rich regions of the world rely on cyberspace, the Information Society’s enabling environment, for their business, commerce, education, socialization. Governments and industry are migrating their critical processes into this domain. These trends will intensify as more people realize cyberspace’s utility. However, the promises of the Information Society may never transpire since there is a lack of trust and security in cyberspace. These two concepts are the foundation on which the utility of inter-networked ICTs, such as the Internet, are built. The increasing rate in the occurrence and sophistication of cybercrimes erodes users’ trust in subscribing to networked services Further the militarization of cyberspace by states as a new domain through which they conduct their operations also presents challenges to the Information Society. Both crime and conflict in cyberspace erode trust in digital networks.
The development of a comprehensive international law for cyberspace is essential to govern state and non-state actor behavior in this global commonage. The formation of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in the early twenty-first century marks the first time that state and non-state actors convened to develop plans of action to guide the development of in the digital world. This project examines the negotiating positions of the United States, Russia and China in the area of cybersecurity through the lens of technogeopolitics. It is shown how the political and military interests of each affect their negotiating positions in the WSIS. The methods of content analyses on material from diplomatic archives, participant-observation at international conferences and interview surveys of participants at these conferences are used to investigate the reasons why decision are made or not made in the field of international cybersecurity cooperation.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
x, 274 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-248)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Panayotis Alexander Yannakogeorgos
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yannakogeorgos
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Panayotis
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1982
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author
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Panayotis Yannakogeorgos
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NamePart (type = family)
Samuels
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Norman
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Norman Samuels
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NamePart (type = family)
Langhorne
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Richard
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co-chair
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Advisory Committee
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Richard Langhorne
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
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Ferguson
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Yale
Role
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co-chair
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Advisory Committee
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Yale H Ferguson
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kutting
NamePart (type = given)
Gabriella
Role
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Gabriella Kutting
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NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
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NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3KD1Z48
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Name
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Yannakogeorgos
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Panayotis
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Name
Panayotis Yannakogeorgos
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
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License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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