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A structural analysis of neighborhood and school effects on immigrant children's academic performance

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
A structural analysis of neighborhood and school effects on immigrant children's academic performance
SubTitle
PartName
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NonSort
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ETD_1813
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000051323
Language (objectPart = )
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eng
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theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Urban Systems
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Immigrant children--Social conditions
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Immigrant children--Education
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Academic achievement
Abstract
Immigrant children are influenced by a variety of contexts, including their family, peer groups, neighborhood, and institutions such as school and the workplace. To gauge how immigrant children fare in education, it is extremely important to understand whether, and how, these contexts affect their academic performance. This dissertation’s theoretical framework is heavily grounded in theories dealing with the impact of neighborhood and school on children’s academic performance. Analyzing nationally representative data from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), this study investigates whether, and how, two of these contexts--neighborhood and school characteristics--influence non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, and Asian immigrant students’ academic performance. Comparison analysis, hierarchical linear modeling, and fixed-effect modeling are used to test six hypotheses. The comparison analysis found that, generally speaking, neighborhood and school conditions are better for non-immigrant than for immigrant students. Specifically, neighborhood and school conditions are better for Asian immigrants than for Hispanic immigrants, and significantly better for immigrant non-Hispanic Whites than for immigrant non-Hispanic Blacks. Multilevel regression analysis found that both neighborhood and school characteristics affect immigrant students’ GPA, while neighborhood-school involvement characteristics do not (neither do they affect non-immigrant students’ GPA). Neighborhood SES and neighborhood immigrant composition affect immigrant students’ GPA. Furthermore, the results show that school socioeconomic status (SES), school climate, and school location affect immigrant students’ GPA. Large class size and school type are associated with non-immigrant students’ GPA. The results of the study imply that both neighborhood and school characteristics influence academic performance of immigrant students more than that of non-immigrant students. Compared to the neighborhood, the school, as an institutional resource, plays a crucial role in immigrant students’ academic performance and their assimilation processes.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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x, 176 p. : ill.
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Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 154-168)
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by Peijia Zha, M.A.
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Zha
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Peijia
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1975
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Peijia Zha
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Jamie
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Lew
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chair
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Lew Jamie
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Alan
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Sadovnik
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Sadovnik Alan
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Jeff
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Jeffery
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Walczyk
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Walczyk Jeffery
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Rutgers University
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Graduate School - Newark
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2009
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2009-05
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xx
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10002600001
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Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3TT4R5P
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
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Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Zha
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Peijia
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Peijia Zha
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Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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2013-02-21
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2015-02-21
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after February 21, 2015.
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