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The link between moral anger and social activism

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
The link between moral anger and social activism
SubTitle
an exploratory study
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_1608
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001800001.ETD.000051636
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Anger
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social reformers
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Political activists
Abstract
“In one autobiography after another we find the same story--the initial action for peace and justice is motivated by anger against injustice. Like the spark that ignites the fuel in an engine, anger is the stimulus that initiates action” (Adams, 2007, p. 10). This study explores one of the pathways to creating change, via examining the mechanism that allows some individuals who have experienced anger as a result of growing up under a system(s) of injustice to transform their anger into moral anger and subsequently into activism. Individuals who experience moral anger often perceive their anger as righteous and justified, linked to something greater than individual self-interest (Potter-Efron, 2005). A semi-structured interview that contained open-ended questions about the individual’s demographics and childhood, exposure to structural violence/social injustice, past and current involvement in social activism, description of moral anger, opportunities to express anger or discuss it with others, and hypotheses about the link between anger and activism was administered to fourteen individuals who self identified as activists. Grounded theory (Corbin & Strauss, 2008) was used to analyze the data. Many interviewees acknowledged times when they felt different from those around them during their childhood/adolescence and described being bothered by how people were treated during their childhood. While some were “intrinsically” drawn to activism, others came to activism through an external experience. The results indicate the importance of normalizing emotions, working together in a collective fashion, developing a critical consciousness through discrete educational experiences, a family legacy of activism, observing activism during childhood or adolescence, observing injustice, exposure to people from different cultures or with different opinions, surviving a family trauma, and accurately identifying emotions. Significant intersection was found between the factors, likely indicative of multiple pathways that work together in a cyclical manner to help individuals channel their anger into moral anger and subsequently into activism. Challenges to expect when channeling anger into activism, limitations of the study, and implications for future research are included. In addition, implications for future curriculum development, for adolescents who are currently experiencing anger as a result of social injustice, are also discussed.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
viii, 156 p.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 132-136)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Talia Miriam Master
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Master
NamePart (type = given)
Talia Miriam
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author
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Talia Miriam Master
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Gantwerk
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Lew
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Lew Gantwerk
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NamePart (type = family)
Boyd-Franklin
NamePart (type = given)
Nancy
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Nancy Boyd-Franklin
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3WS8TFW
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
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Master
GivenName
Talia
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Name
Talia Master
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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399360
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