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An exploratory study of child obesity concerns among African-American children and parents

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
An exploratory study of child obesity concerns among African-American children and parents
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2202
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001800001.ETD.000051649
Language (objectPart = )
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eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Obesity in children
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
African American children
Abstract
Childhood obesity is reaching epidemic levels in the United States with current prevalence rates at more than three times the “Healthy People 2000” goal. African Americans, other minorities, and low SES populations are disproportionately affected, and the adverse cardiovascular, respiratory and endocrine health implications typically associated with adult obesity are now evident in children. Developing effective child obesity communication messages and interventions to reach African Americans is critical if the prevalence trends and health disparities are to be reversed. This exploratory study sought to add to the literature by examining the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of an indicated group of young overweight African American children and their parents, and by better describing their felt experience. Principles of community psychology informed the philosophy and implementation of the study, as resulting guidance for community-based interventions was sought. This area of psychology also offers a collaborative approach to entering and working with communities, such as African Americans, who have shown suspicion to traditional research and also in this instance may not be motivated for change. Eighteen subjects participated in separate parent and child focus groups, and the data were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin’s (1998) grounded theory method. Nine key qualitative themes and directional implications from a parent survey are described in the results. Additionally, in order to understand clinical implications, two hybridized case studies representing prototypical client presentations were developed from the data and analyzed using Fishman’s (1999) pragmatic case study method. The cases represent a client who might be more responsive to intervention and one whose clinical presentation and situational characteristics suggest more barriers to treatment. A detailed case comparison further explicates attendant factors that are likely to affect communication messages, outreach, and treatment outcome with these types of clients. Study limitations are discussed, and the report concludes with implications for future community-based research and treatment, specifically with African Americans.
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electronic resource
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viii, 140 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 116-124)
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by Karla E. Bailey
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Bailey
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Karla E.
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1965
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Karla E. Bailey
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Fishman
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Daniel
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Daniel B. Fishman
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Boyd-Franklin
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Nancy
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Nancy Boyd-Franklin
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
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xx
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10001800001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3930TBB
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Bailey
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Karla
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Karla Bailey
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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application/pdf
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481280
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