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Predictors of caller feedback evaluations following crisis and suicide hotline calls

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Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Predictors of caller feedback evaluations following crisis and suicide hotline calls
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2060
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001800001.ETD.000051654
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Hotlines (Counseling)
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Crisis intervention (Mental health services)
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Suicide--Prevention
Abstract
This study investigates the relationship of caller follow-up evaluations to standardized measures of symptom reduction, caller characteristics, and interventions made during calls. Within a national multi-site evaluation of hotline centers, a sample of 710 adult crisis callers and 349 adult suicide callers completed a 21-item quantitative satisfaction measure through a structured phone interview. How callers evaluated their hotline experience two weeks after their call related significantly to standardized measures of their psychological state during and after the calls. The strongest relationships were found between callers’ answers to a one-item self-evaluation of Overall Improvement and positive changes in psychological states between the beginning of the call and the two-week follow-up, and between the end of the call and the two week follow-up. For crisis callers, their two-week follow-up single-item evaluations of Overall Improvement related the most to improvements in their mood from the beginning of the call to the two-week follow-up, as measured by a modified version of McNair, Lorr, and Droppleman’s (1992) shortened POMS. Secondly, their follow-up evaluation of Overall Improvement related inversely to their current state of Hopelessness, as measured by quantitative responses to two questions regarding “hope for improvement” and “ability to go on” at the time of follow-up. For suicide callers, their single-item follow-up evaluation of Overall Improvement related the most to degree of reduction in their Hopelessness from the end of the call to the two-week follow-up. Secondly, it also related to the degree of reduction in Psychological Pain (Shneidman, 1993) from the beginning of their call to the two-week follow-up. Smaller but also significant relationships were found between predictors and follow-up evaluations of factor-analyzed categories of Improved Problem-Solving and Emotion Regulation. Thus, hotline client follow-up evaluations of Improvement showed some validity, in that they had relationships with pre- and post-psychological measures. The meaning and usefulness of follow-up caller feedback as an outcome measure are discussed.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
vii, 126 p.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 88-97)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Dana Lorraine Millstein
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Millstein
NamePart (type = given)
Dana Lorraine
NamePart (type = termsOfAddress)
NamePart (type = date)
1979
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author
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Dana Lorraine Millstein
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Bry
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Brenna
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Brenna H Bry
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Indart
NamePart (type = given)
Monica
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Monica J Indart
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3XS5VK8
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Name
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Millstein
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Dana
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Name
Dana Millstein
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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3072000
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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