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A rational approach to the prediction of reflective cracking in bituminous overlays for concrete pavements

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
A rational approach to the prediction of reflective cracking in bituminous overlays for concrete pavements
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2069
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051780
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Pavements, Asphalt concrete--Cracking
Abstract
Hot mix asphalt (HMA) is used as the primary overlying material of concrete pavements during rehabilitation because of its inexpensive nature when compared to most Portland cement concrete (PCC) rehabilitation/reconstruction alternatives. However, due to the majority of the PCC pavements being in average to poor condition, many HMA overlays are exposed to extreme movements (both vertical and horizontal). The combination of associated load and environmentally induced movements creates complex stresses and strains in the vicinity of expansion joints and cracks in the PCC, thus dramatically reducing the life of the HMA overlay, typically in the form of reflective cracking. Reflective cracking is a fatigue cracking distress, which is initiated at the bottom of the HMA overlay and propagates to the surface. When the crack reaches the HMA overlay surface, not only does it affect the ride quality and overall integrity of the pavement surface, but it also creates a path for which water can migrate down into and below the PCC layer. This can ultimately reduce the overall structural support of the composite (HMA and PCC) pavement and result in a complete pavement failure. Medium to high severity reflective cracking results in poor surface conditions that could lead to poor driving conditions and higher accident rates. Therefore, this research is timely in that it not only addresses the structural integrity of the pavement system, but also the safety of the driving public, which is one of the main objectives of the administration at state agencies.
To better understand the mechanisms associated with the development of reflective cracking, an extensive literature review was conducted. Analysis of the literature review indicated significant gaps in the current state of the practice in using bituminous overlays on PCC pavements. To fill in these gaps, a survey was developed, distributed to the state transportation agencies of all fifty states, and compiled to better define the scope of the research. The survey clearly identified that a major gap in the current state of the practice is linking the field conditions (climate, deflections, traffic levels) to appropriate laboratory testing protocols. Therefore, field test sections were selected with appropriate field forensic testing and traffic collection. During construction of the bituminous overlays, loose mix was collected and brought back to the laboratory for material characterization testing that would simulate the loading conditions associated with the respective test section.
The research conducted during the development of this thesis has led to a rational approach in the prediction of reflective cracking potential in HMA overlays placed on PCC pavements. This methodology utilizes field forensic information that would normally be collected during the evaluation of the PCC/composite pavement prior to rehabilitation and laboratory fatigue and stiffness characterization of the HMA mixture(s), to predict the potential for reflective cracking in the bituminous overlay mixture(s). The extensive laboratory testing and field calibration/verification information utilized in the research has also led to “decision tree” methodology that would allow state agencies to properly select asphalt mixtures for overlaying PCC pavements.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
xxii, 203 p. : ill
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 194-197)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Thomas A. Bennert
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Bennert
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Thomas
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Thomas Bennert
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Maher
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Ali
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Ali Maher
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Gucunski
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Nenad Gucunski
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Balaguru
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Perumalsamy
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Perumalsamy Balaguru
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Foden
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Andrew
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Andrew Foden
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Rutgers University
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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OriginInfo
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2009
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2009-10
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xx
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Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore19991600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38G8KVP
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
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Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Bennert
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Thomas
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Thomas Bennert
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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