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Environmental variables affect fungal diversity on blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) leaf surfaces

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Environmental variables affect fungal diversity on blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) leaf surfaces
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_1803
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10005600001.ETD.000051331
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Blueberries
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Leaves--Diseases and pests
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Plant-fungus relationships
Abstract
The economically important blueberry, Vaccinium cyanococcus, is susceptible to a number of diseases, some of which are propagated by fungi living on the leaf surface. The leaf surface (phylloplane) is a cryptic environment that harbors a variety of pathogens and pathogen antagonists, and these populations are affected by many factors including weather, season, host plant location and leaf phenology. Blueberry leaves were collected in April, June, August, and October over two years from bushes in wild areas and cultivated farms along transects perpendicular to the Atlantic City Expressway, to address the hypothesis that pollution from a major highway would influence phylloplane communities. Leaves were washed and plated on potato dextrose agar, and fungal epiphytes were identified using taxonomic keys and microscopy. Epicoccum spp., Alternaria spp., Pennicilium spp., and Curvularia spp. were the most ubiquitous fungi isolated from blueberry leaves. Community structure and species richness changed from site-to-site and month-to-month and from year-to-year. The influence of highway proximity to fungal communities was not significant. Management practices in cultivated sites accounted for much of the variation in species richness and community composition among sites. Leaf age also influenced the community structure of phylloplane fungi communities. Leaves collected in April had significantly lower species richness than those collect in later months (F=19.37, P<0.0001). Yearly differences in species richness and community structure were likely due to differences in meteorological variables. Greater information provided by frequency of occurrence of fungal species would lead to a more informative multivariate analysis as presence or absence would be weighted by abundance, allowing for interpretations of dominance and more detailed analysis of phylloplane fungal communities.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xi, 54 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note
Supplementary File: Figure 1
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Supplementary File: Figure 1a
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Supplementary File: Figure 2
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Supplementary File: Figure 2a
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Supplementary File: Figure 3
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Supplementary File: Figure 3a
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Supplementary File: Figure 4
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Supplementary File: Figure 5
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Supplementary File: Figure 6
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Supplementary File: Figure 6a
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Supplementary File: Figure 7
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Supplementary File: Figure 8
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Supplementary File: Figure 9
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 25-27)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Jason Stanwood
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stanwood
NamePart (type = given)
Jason
NamePart (type = date)
1977
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
author
DisplayForm
Jason Stanwood
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dighton
NamePart (type = given)
John
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
John Dighton
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Morgan
NamePart (type = given)
Mark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Mark Morgan
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shane
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Daniel Shane
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T32Z15Q7
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Stanwood
GivenName
Jason
Role
Copyright holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
Label
Place
DateTime
Detail
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Jason Stanwood
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Camden
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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