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Natural bioactive-based polyanhydrides for controlled release applications

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Natural bioactive-based polyanhydrides for controlled release applications
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2061
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051788
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Chemistry
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Controlled release technology
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Anhydrides
Abstract
Hydrolytically degradable polyanhydrides are of interest for a variety of controlled release applications because of their surface-eroding behavior and tunable degradation rate based on polymer chemical composition. Rather than physical admixtures, bioactives were chemically incorporated either directly into the polymer backbone or as pendant groups via hydrolytically degradable linkages.
A series of poly(anhydride-esters) containing iodinated salicylates were synthesized via both melt-condensation and solution polymerization to generate X-ray opaque polymers. It was found that physical and mechanical properties were affected by polymerization technique, and thermal properties such as glass transition temperature were dependent on the amount of iodine in the polymer.
The degradation rate of salicylic acid (SA)-based polyanhydrides was manipulated to release SA over prolonged periods of time (i.e., months) and over relatively short periods of time (i.e., days). First, a series of copolymers based on a SA-based diacid and highly aromatic comonomers 1,6-bis(o-carboxyphenoxy)hexane (o-CPH) and 1,6-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)hexane (p-CPH) were developed. By changing the molar ratios of SA-based diacid to o-CPH or p-CPH, the thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting copolymers varied, and the degradation rate was decreased. Alternately, two methods were used to form fast-degrading polymers: changing the structure of the diacid’s “linker” molecule and synthesizing a copolymer containing a more hydrophilic comonomer. These polymers completely degraded in one week or less.
Mono-functional antimicrobials were chemically incorporated as pendant groups via ester linkages to a polyanhydride backbone based on ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, resulting in a completely bioactive polymer. The polymers degraded in less than 1 week, and some displayed the ability to completely prevent Salmonella biofilm formation.
Lastly, polymers based on antimicrobial and antioxidant preservatives (i.e., hydroxycinnamates) were synthesized and found to release the preservatives over a prolonged period of time (> 1 month). Polymer degradation products exhibited antioxidant activity, and experiments indicated that free bioactives are responsible for antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the polymers contain double bonds that can be crosslinked to form hydrophobic networks.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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xxvii, 176 p. : ill
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application/pdf
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ashley Lauren Carbone
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Carbone
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Ashley Lauren
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1984
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author
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Ashley Lauren Carbone
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Uhrich
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Kathryn
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Kathryn E Uhrich
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Warmuth
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Ralf
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Ralf Warmuth
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Jimenez
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Leslie
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Leslie Jimenez
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
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Chikindas
NamePart (type = given)
Mikhail
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Mikhail Chikindas
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
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xx
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3BG2P6R
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
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Carbone
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Ashley
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Name
Ashley Carbone
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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