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A fine balance

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
A fine balance
SubTitle
re-making Muslim modernity and religious practices in Delhi and New York City
TitleInfo (ID = T-2); (type = alternative)
Title
Re-making Muslim modernity and religious practices in Delhi and New York City
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2123
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051793
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Anthropology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Muslims--India--Delhi
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Muslims--New York (State)--New York
Abstract
How do middle-class Muslims make sense of their religion and of their own selves as Muslims, while occupying the position of highly stigmatized religious minorities? How do they live with and attempt to resolve the contradiction of an Islam that is the source of all that is good and worthwhile and an Islam that stands for backwardness, fanaticism, and terror? This dissertation, based on twenty four months of participant observation in India (Delhi) and the United States (New York City), focuses on how middle-class Muslims in these two sites are re-making what it means to be a pious Muslim and a modern person, as they live their everyday lives in ways that demonstrate that it is entirely possible to be both religious and modern in a world which routinely places Islam in an antithetical relation to modernity. I argue that given the insistent dominant representations of Muslims as anti-modern and backward, Muslims cannot help but engage with the discourses that produce them as such. This engagement in turn produces new understandings of what it means to be both Muslim and modern. At the core of this middle-class Muslim modernity, there is an emphasis on critical thinking that must be brought to bear on all aspects of their lives including their religion. At the same time, in this process of re-presenting themselves as modern, middle-class Muslims are not setting aside their religion but presenting Islam as providing a means for a thoroughly modern way of being in the world in ways that enable us to rethink the tradition/modernity dichotomy. Having already been stigmatized as backward and anti-modern through various public discourses, middle-class Muslims often represent themselves as modern through drawing specific contrasts between their own religious beliefs and practices and those of less educated, lower-class Muslims whom they designate in turn as backward. The very religion of Islam, on account of which Muslims are marked off as non-modern, is thus transformed in the discourses and actions of middle-class Muslims into the site for performing and appropriating modernity.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
xi, 294 p.
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application/pdf
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 281-293)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Arpita Chakrabarti
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Chakrabarti
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Arpita
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author
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Arpita Chakrabarti
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Schein
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Louisa
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Louisa Schein
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Ahearn
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Laura
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Advisory Committee
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Laura Ahearn
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Haugerud
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Angelique
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Advisory Committee
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Angelique Haugerud
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Brooks
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Ethel
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Ethel Brooks
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Abu-Lughod
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Lila
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Lila Abu-Lughod
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NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3057G3M
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Chakrabarti
GivenName
Arpita
Role
Copyright holder
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Place
DateTime
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Name
Arpita Chakrabarti
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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