Staff View
Polish feminism between East and West

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Polish feminism between East and West
SubTitle
the formation of the Polish women’s movement identity
TitleInfo (ID = T-2); (type = alternative)
Title
Formation of the Polish women’s movement identity
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2212
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051830
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Women's and Gender Studies
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Feminism--Poland
Abstract
By focusing on the unique forces that shape women’s movements in the post-communist context, this dissertation asks if the established geopolitical and theoretical frameworks, based on dichotomies between East and West, South and North can be utilized outside these locations. Or is a new framework necessary to fully understand the specific processes that are at work in the ambiguous “Second” World location? Chapter One, traces the individual and collective trajectories of Polish women’s movement to the 19th century anti-partition mobilizations, the Second World War, the 1968 students’ liberation movement, the “Solidarity” labor union, and the 1990s Polish debate on abortion. Chapter Two identifies two elements as crucial for the unique development of transnational activism in the context of CEE: 1) its trajectory (“late” arrival into the international feminist space) and 2) the domination and critique of the EU “gender mainstreaming” paradigm within gender social justice discourses. Chapter Three recognizes the 1990s “abortion debate” became in impulse for the feminisms to move beyond the borders of the conservative nation state and bring the question of women’s sexual rights into the supranational political spaces and became a momentum for the emergence of versatile, vibrant mobilizations for gender and sexual justice in Poland and (e.g. European Court of Justice decision in the case of Alicja Tysiac against the Polish state). Chapter Four argues that secularism that had become, a necessary feminist response to violent and oppressive discourses that act to restrict women’s sexualities and rights, has also hindered feminist connectivity with religious women. In Poland a purification of the sexuality, emergence of the “political Catholicism” and “secular feminism” produced the subaltern, traveling identities of Catholic feminists. Chapter Five examines re-appropriation of the Anti-Semitic language of civic strangeness, historically represented by Polish Jews to the experience of sexual minorities. In conclusion this dissertation delineates two factors as decisive for current positionality of the “Second” world in the transnational feminist theory and practice: the rejection of Marxism as representing the colonial practices from the East (Russia, Soviet Union), the priotization of the supranational engagements with the European Union and Western Europe rather then Third World.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
iv, 320 p.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 293-309)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Magdalena Grabowska
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Grabowska
NamePart (type = given)
Magdalena
NamePart (type = date)
1976-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
author
DisplayForm
Magdalena Grabowska
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Regulska
NamePart (type = given)
Joanna
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Joanna Regulska
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hawkesworth
NamePart (type = given)
Mary
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Mary Hawkesworth
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kaplan
NamePart (type = given)
Temma
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Temma Kaplan
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Snitow
NamePart (type = given)
Ann
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Ann Snitow
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38S4Q2M
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Grabowska
GivenName
Magdalena
Role
Copyright holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
Label
Place
DateTime
Detail
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Magdalena Grabowska
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Back to the top

Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
62177280
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
490afc6c13aa602268ecd13cb9f3a5cbe901d26a
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021