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Net power in action

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Net power in action
SubTitle
internet activism in the contentious politics of South Korea
TitleInfo (ID = T-2); (type = alternative)
Title
Internet activism in the contentious politics of South Korea
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_1889
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051855
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Internet--Political aspects--Korea (South)
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Korea (South)--Politics and government
Abstract
This study examines the ways in which the Internet is utilized for progressive civic action, focusing on a detailed case study of Internet activism of South Korea. The goals of this study are to examine: the ways in which the Internet is utilized for progressive civic action; the extent to which Internet activism is differentiated from preexisting social movements; and the ways in which the Internet affects movement repertoires and organizational forms of civic action. Toward this end, this study encompasses four main areas: (1) historical background of Korean Internet activism; (2) social agents of Internet activism; (3) movement repertoires and awareness of citizenship; and (4) theoretical implications of the Korean case. This study employs multiple research methods including qualitative framing analysis, in-depth interviews, and focus-group interviews as well as quantitative methods.
The findings of this study suggest that Korean Internet activism has had a huge impact on political and cultural environments. Korea’s liberal and critical younger generations have predominantly used the Internet, constituting amorphous and hybrid groups of Internet users who are aware of citizenship—namely netizens. Positing themselves distinctly from preexisting activist groups including social movement organizations (SMOs), Korean netizens have utilized the Internet for resource mobilization, virtual struggles, and alternative knowledge production for progressive civic action. Through serial events from 2002 to 2007, Korean netizens and SMOs have collaborated on the one hand and contended on the other hand. Netizens have expedited horizontal and decentralized networks for communication and mobilization while SMOs have maintained hierarchical organizational forms and centralized leadership.
This study also found that Korean Internet activism has brought about noticeable changes in movement repertoires. Netizens have organically combined online and offline struggles, converged sub-cultural and political discourses, and constructed distributed trust and counter-hegemonic frames through interactive communications based on datgul [replies] and pumjil [copy-and-paste]. Different from Chadwick’s hybrid mobilization movement model based on Western experience, organizational innovations of civic action have mainly been led by netizens, rather than by SMOs. While many Korean SMOs have adopted new movement repertoires for resource mobilization, they have failed to internalize new values embedded in the netizens’ movement repertoires.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
x, 206 p. : ill.
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 192-203)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Jinsun Lee
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Lee
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Jinsun
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1963-
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Jinsun Lee
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Pavlik
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John
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John V. Pavlik
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Bratich
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Jack
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Jack Bratich
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Keith
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Susan
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Advisory Committee
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Susan Keith
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Lee
NamePart (type = given)
Dong-hoo
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Dong-hoo Lee
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3CV4HXZ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Name
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Lee
GivenName
Jinsun
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Copyright holder
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DateTime
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Name
Jinsun Lee
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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3348480
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