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Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into neural lineages in an alginate encapsulation microenvironment

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into neural lineages in an alginate encapsulation microenvironment
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2175
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051860
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Chemical and Biochemical Engineering
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Embryonic stem cells--Differentiation
Abstract
Cell replacement therapies, using renewable stem cell sources, hold tremendous potential to treat a wide range of degenerative diseases. Although many studies have established techniques to successfully differentiate stem cells into different mature cell lineages using growth factors or extracellular matrix protein supplementation in both two and three-dimensional configurations, their practicality is limited by lack of control, low yields of differentiated cells and oftentimes, heterogeneous cell population outcomes. In order to address these issues, we have previously established a murine embryonic stem cell alginate-poly-l-lysine microencapsulation differentiation system. The three-dimensional alginate microenvironment maintains cell viability, is conducive to ES cell differentiation to hepatocyte lineage cells, and sustains differentiated cellular function. In addition, hepatocyte function was contingent upon aggregate formation within the alginate microbeads. The present studies were designed to determine the feasibility of adapting the alginate encapsulation technique to neuronal lineage differentiation. The results of our studies indicate that by incorporating the soluble inducer, retinoic acid into the permeable microcapsule system, cell aggregation was decreased and neuronal lineage differentiation enhanced. In conjunction with the mechanical and physical characterization of the alginate crosslinking network, we have determined that 2.2% alginate microencapsulation can be optimally adapted to both hepatocyte and neuronal differentiation from embryonic stem cells. However, differentiation could be directed away from the hepatocyte and towards the neural lineage by lowering initial seeding density and physical cell-cell aggregation blocking, even in the absence of RA. This study promises to offer insights into targeting cellular differentiation towards both endodermal and ectodermal cell lineages, and could potentially be generalizable and adaptable to the differentiation of other stem cell types given the correct inducible factors and material properties.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
xii, 80 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 74-78)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Lulu Li
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Li
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Lulu
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1980-
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author
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Lulu Li
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NamePart (type = family)
Yarmush
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Martin
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Martin L. Yarmush
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NamePart (type = family)
Langrana
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Noshir
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co-chair
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Advisory Committee
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Noshir A. Langrana
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Shreiber
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David
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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David I. Shreiber
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Chiew
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Yee
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Yee C. Chiew
Name (ID = NAME-6); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Firestein
NamePart (type = given)
Bonnie
Role
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Bonnie Firestein
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T35B02NF
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Li
GivenName
Lulu
Role
Copyright holder
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Type
Permission or license
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Place
DateTime
Detail
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Name
Lulu Li
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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3256320
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