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Community and contention in early modern England

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Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Community and contention in early modern England
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2227
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051862
Language (objectPart = )
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eng
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theses
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Topic
Political Science
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Church and state--England--History--17th century
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Great Britain--Politics and government--17th century
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Great Britain--Religion--17th century
Abstract
Comparative analysis of the impact of religion on liberal political development is hampered by the presumption of secularization in canonical works of historical institutionalism. The prevailing arguments about the origins of liberal political institutions either omit religion completely as a significant factor in political and social life, or presume unique compatibility between Protestant Christianity and liberal democracy. This project challenges both the assumption of secular modernity and Christian exceptionalism as preconditions of liberal political development by examining the debates about religious toleration in early modern England. The toleration debates provide a record of the ideas generated in response to state expansion, and demonstrate the critical role of religion in establishing the modern state as the primary frame of political power. They further illustrate the importance of religious narratives in justifying liberal political principles such as popular sovereignty and accountable government, as well as the fundamental rights to freedom of speech, the press, association and conscience.
Drawing upon original readings of pamphlets, newspapers and political tracts from the seventeenth century, I argue that religion promoted political transformation in early modern England not because of the specifics of doctrine or decline in its relevance to social and political life, but because it was the locus of individual experience of state power. The monarchy radically extended its scope and capacity by appropriating the institutional and symbolic resources of the church. It used the church to promote institutional and cultural regularity across the realm. The common experience of civil power through state regulation of religious practice led to the development of a collective interest in securing the right to religious worship that extended across class and regional divisions. The Protestant political identity cultivated by the monarchy in its campaign for religious uniformity created cultural opportunities for political resistance to the state’s encroachment upon communal and individual autonomy. Competing interpretations of the meaning and requirements of this Protestant identity for individuals on one hand, and the requisites of political order and stability on the other, led to a public reconceptualization of the role of government and the rights and responsibilities of political membership.
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electronic resource
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xi, 356 p.
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 328-354)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Amy Linch
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Linch
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Amy
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1967-
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Amy Linch
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Schochet
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Gordon
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Gordon Schochet
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Kubik
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Jan
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co-chair
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Advisory Committee
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Jan Kubik
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Bathory
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Dennis
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internal member
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Dennis Bathory
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Fulton
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Thomas
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Thomas Fulton
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
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xx
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3DV1K19
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The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
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Name
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Linch
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Amy
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Copyright holder
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DateTime
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Amy Linch
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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