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Birth behind the veil

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Birth behind the veil
SubTitle
African American midwives and mothers in the rural south, 1921-1962
TitleInfo (ID = T-2); (type = alternative)
Title
African American midwives and mothers in the rural south, 1921-1962
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2221
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000051876
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
History
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
African American midwives--Southern States--History--20th century
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Midwifery--Southern States--History--20th century
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Childbirth--Southern States--History--20th century
Abstract
By the early twentieth century, the majority of white women living in the United States were giving birth in hospitals under the care of a physician. In 1921, the majority of women who gave birth under conditions that were indigenous, eclectic, spirit based, and not according to the standards of modern medicine, were the rural black women of the South. African American midwives and women of the South maintained the core
qualities of the home birthing traditions, handed down through a matrilineal system of recruitment and training from the period of enslavement throughout the twentieth century. This occurred amidst a major program of midwife training and regulation.
Public Health officials of the early twentieth century urged midwife regulation as a temporary measure. Medical professionals considered the lay midwives of the south a necessary evil. They were necessary because the population they served was left out of a medical system that operated according to the practices and laws of racial segregation.
They were evil, however, because they were believed to carry disease, to be incapable and inherently responsible for elevated levels of infant and maternal mortality in the South. Yet health authorities could think of no better solution then to train and regulate the best of the practicing lay midwives and eliminate those whom they considered unwilling to follow safe practices.
Despite the beliefs of the medical community, African American childbearing women of the South relied upon the services of lay midwives. The transition from home to hospital birth was not a smooth transition for rural southern women. There were socioeconomic barriers to a hospital birth for many. However, there were also cultural and spiritual reasons for their preferences. They did not appear to associate midwives with unsafe conditions. In fact, the reverse was the case. This study examines the movement from the lay assisted births of the early twentieth century through the medicalized events of the later decades. African American women of the South approached modern medicine in various ways, yet always through the multiple lenses of racial segregation, deep spiritual beliefs surrounding childbirth, and the viewpoints of their ancestors. These factors were more prominent in impacting the birth experience then the views, perceptions, and regulations of the health care professionals who were officially responsible for the birth event.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
v, 202 p.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 192-201)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Kelena Reid Maxwell
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Maxwell
NamePart (type = given)
Kelena Reid
NamePart (type = date)
1970-
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author
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Kelena Reid Maxwell
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
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White
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Deborah
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Deborah Gray White
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NamePart (type = family)
Wailoo
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Keith
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Keith Wailoo
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mack
NamePart (type = given)
Phyllis
Role
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Phyllis Mack
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Higginbotham
NamePart (type = given)
Evelyn
Role
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outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37944VR
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Maxwell
GivenName
Kelena
Role
Copyright holder
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Type
Permission or license
Label
Place
DateTime
Detail
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Kelena Maxwell
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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1024000
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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