Staff View
Henry Adams and the forms of historical explanation

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Henry Adams and the forms of historical explanation
SubTitle
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_2419
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000052115
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Adams, Henry, 1838-1918--Criticism and interpretation
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literatures in English
Abstract
Henry Adams' thinking began and ended with forms, the models he was given that no longer worked, and the new forms he sought that might shape a future, or project its pattern. Dismayed by the experience of accelerating change, he tried to use history to identify and explain the forces at work. This dissertation explores Adams' search for an adequate explanation as a series of experiments in form. An examination of his major works, the History of the United States, Democracy and Esther, the Memoirs of Arii Taimai, Mont Saint Michel and Chartres and The Education of Henry Adams, reveals the extent to which Adams always wrote as a historian and yet in resistance to the prescriptions of history. His experiments started with inherited models, which he tried to remake for a new age, but what Adams usually produced was not a reformation, but a proliferation of forms. Whatever their genre, Adams' texts continually rebel against expectations. By resisting a conventional emplotment, which is action fitted to historical time, in effect they rebel against history. Adams' experiments end in impasse, uncertainty, and questions, but his failures authorize new investigations. Adams' writing is full of irreconcilable elements and dialectics that can never be resolved; foremost among these is sexual difference. Treated as alternating polarities of form, these conflicts can be a source of creative tension and imaginative possibility. Adams insisted on history as both art and science despite the uneasy coexistence of the two. What scientific history meant to him shifted from a belief in a Rankean methodology, to the adoption of the explanatory language of the social and physical sciences, to the dream of a great generalization putting all human history under law. The legacy of his name made him a historian, yet one with an orientation to ultimate ends rather than origins. For Adams, history was written with a civic purpose. Questions of form could not be separated from that purpose, nor the vexed problem of finding an audience.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
vi, 601 p.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliographic history)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 581-600)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Virginia Gilmartin
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gilmartin
NamePart (type = given)
Virginia
NamePart (type = termsOfAddress)
NamePart (type = date)
1950-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
author
Description
DisplayForm
Virginia Gilmartin
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jehlen
NamePart (type = given)
Myra
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Myra Jehlen
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Evans
NamePart (type = given)
Brad
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Brad Evans
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jackson
NamePart (type = given)
Gregory
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Gregory Jackson
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lears
NamePart (type = given)
Jackson
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Jackson Lears
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB); (type = )
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3P84C1K
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Gilmartin
GivenName
Virginia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = RE-1)
Type
Permission or license
Label
Place
DateTime
2010-01-06 16:53:43
Detail
AssociatedEntity (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = AE-1)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Virginia Gilmartin
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = AO-1)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent (AUTHORITY = rulib); (ID = RE-2)
Type
Embargo
DateTime
2011-06-01
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after June 1, 2014.
Back to the top

Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
2396160
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
1020a6a787a43518ed8006bfcc3db4281673c07e
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021