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Japanese middle schools' adaptation of the integrated studies

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Japanese middle schools' adaptation of the integrated studies
SubTitle
a case study
PartName
PartNumber
NonSort
Identifier (displayLabel = ); (invalid = )
ETD_1696
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000052284
Language (objectPart = )
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Education
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Middle schools--Curricula--Japan
Abstract
In 1998, Education Ministry of Japan announced the enactment of the periods of the Integrated Studies (IS) at all public school levels. The IS is defined as interdisciplinary, project-oriented learning activities which aim to promote students’ problem-solving abilities and self-learning skills. In spite of teachers' active involvement in the development of various educational activities for the periods, research indicated that teachers faced various barriers to implementing the IS. Generally, the middle school teachers were unsupportive to the IS due to their lack of resources for the curriculum development. Despite the constraints, how was the IS implemented in the middle schools? What kind of roles did the IS take in the curriculum? How did the teachers view the constraints to their implementation of the IS?
By taking "adaptation" perspective for educational policy implementation (McLaughlin, 1976b), this study examined the realities of the middle schools' implementation of the IS based on a multiple case study of three middle schools in Osaka. This study analyzed the data from my five months of field research in the schools, which included interviews with the teachers, observation of the teachers' implementation of the IS, survey of the teachers as well as collection of school documents.
The research findings are summarized as following. First, the analysis showed the IS periods assured the room for the schools' autonomous development of projects with specific sociocivic themes and increased the opportunities for various new learning styles (e.g., self-inquiry, presentation, and various hands-on activities). However, a large part of the IS periods was utilized for the schools' existing practices like career guidance or school events reflecting the middle schools' needs on sustaining its traditional curriculum. Consequently, the space for new learning styles was dispersed across the three years' curriculum, and tended to decrease in the higher grade.
Finally, the comparison of the three schools sheds light on the difference of the attitudes to the implementation of the IS across the schools. The analysis attributed this difference to some factors including shared pedagogy of the IS, longitudinal experience of collaboration, organizational context like school-size, and the degree of students' behavioral problems.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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x, 237 p.
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Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-229)
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by Nobuhiko Hamamoto
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Hamamoto
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Nobuhiko
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1977-
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author
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Nobuhiko Hamamoto
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Lugg
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Catherine
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Catherine A Lugg
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William
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Firestone
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Firestone A William
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Ryan
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Sharon
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Advisory Committee
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Sharon Ryan
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Gerald
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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LeTendre K Gerald
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Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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Graduate School - New Brunswick
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school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (point = ); (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009-05
Place
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xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore19991600001
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T39K4BCB
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

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The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Notice
Note
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Note
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Hamamoto
GivenName
Nobuhiko
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Copyright Holder
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Place
DateTime
2009-04-14 18:46:59
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Name
Nobuhiko Hamamoto
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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365 days
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application/pdf
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