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Comorbidity & childhood psychopathology

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Comorbidity & childhood psychopathology
SubTitle
relations to profiles of behavior and neuroanatomy
TitleInfo (ID = T-2); (type = alternative)
Title
Comorbidity and childhood psychopathology
Identifier
ETD_2696
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001800001.ETD.000052876
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
School Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Autism in children
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Child psychopathology
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Manic-depressive illness in children
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Comorbidity
Subject (ID = SBJ-6); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neuroanatomy
Subject (ID = SBJ-7); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neurobehavioral disorders
Abstract
Childhood psychopathology refers to a heterogeneous set of psychological conditions that negatively influence functioning. To improve treatment, effort has been directed at defining, and categorizing disorders. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the primary source for diagnostic information in the US, updates diagnostic criteria to parallel research and clinical advances. Nevertheless, much symptom overlap remains across conditions, complicating diagnosis and slowing research progress. Latent class analysis (LCA), a person-centered analytic approach, was used to explore new diagnostic groupings based on primary and comorbid diagnostic data from children with a diagnosis of Autistic Disorder or Asperger's Syndrome (ASD) (n = 76) or Bipolar Disorder (BPD) (n = 36), compared to 27 controls. LCA was expected to identify a subset of children with high comorbidity who would demonstrate distinct neuroanatomical and behavioral profiles. Comparison of the temporal cortex, amygdala, or hippocampus volumes between the diagnostic groups, and between the derived clinical latent classes, revealed no significant differences. The diagnostic groups were different on several problem behavior subscales, as were the latent classes. All clinical groups had more behavioral problems compared to controls. Although results did not support the use of comorbid information to improve diagnostic profiles, large within-group variances in the primary diagnostic groups supported the need to improve differential diagnoses. The DSM-IV categorical classification system is limited in its ability to characterize 'comorbid' symptomology. In the DSM-V, inclusion of a dimensional component and 'cross cutting' symptoms would provide clinicians with a useful way to differentiate disorders and evaluate symptom severity.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
viii, 87 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references (p. 74-81)
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Nora Anne Merritt Pellegrino
Note
Includes abstract
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pellegrino
NamePart (type = given)
Nora Anne Merritt
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Nora Pellegrino
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bates
NamePart (type = given)
Marsha E.
Role
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Marsha E. Bates
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mun
NamePart (type = given)
Eun Young
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Eun Young Mun
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Buckman
NamePart (type = given)
Jennifer F.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Jennifer F. Buckman
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3V9885J
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Pellegrino
GivenName
Nora
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-05-04 21:13:16
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Nora Pellegrino
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
552960
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
f138a1fa848e45ec7b2b5e5680dc600cf278efc0
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