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Regression analysis of self-regulatory concepts to predict community college math achievement and persistence

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Regression analysis of self-regulatory concepts to predict community college math achievement and persistence
Identifier
ETD_2659
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001500001.ETD.000052901
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Educational Statistics and Measurement
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mathematics--Study and teaching
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Regression analysis--Mathematical models
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Academic achievement
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Time management
Abstract
Open door admissions at community colleges bring returning adults, first timers, low achievers, disabled persons, and immigrants. Passing and retention rates for remedial and non-developmental math courses can be comparatively inadequate (LAVC, 2005; CCPRDC, 2000; SBCC, 2004; Seybert & Soltz, 1992; Waycaster, 2002). Mathematics achievement historically has been a subject of concern with community colleges, universities, and primary schools (Davis, 1994; MEC, 1997; NCTM, 1989, 2000; Wang-Iverson, 1998). An important statistic of community colleges is that more than 83% of students work full or part-time (NEDRC, 2000; Phillippe & Patton, 2000). Conventional homework time estimates can range from 1-3 hours of homework for every hour of in-class instruction. Self-regulatory learning has been proposed to improve opportunity for math achievement (Bembenutty, 2005; Ironsmith et al., 2003; Jones & Byrnes, 2006; Pajares & Graham, 1999; Schunk, 1990). Seventeen research questions were made to explore the relative influences of goal setting, time planning, and time usage on mathematics achievement and persistence. Math students from 8 classes at a large, northeastern community college were administered 3 surveys asking self-regulatory questions.Results were found from descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, correlation matrices, t-tests, multiple regressions, and logistic regressions. Goal setting and time management were significant contributors in the model for predicting non-remedial students' final average. With respect to remedial students' final average, goal setting was related but all of the time planning and usage variables were not. Non-remedial students may have been more realistic about their course goals. However, non-remedial students were overly optimistic about allocating their time. No practical information regarding math student persistence beyond the first exam was found. Notable statistics from this study included: students spent about 5 to 6 hours per week on their math homework and over 80% worked at least 15 hours per week. Students worked more job hours on average than on all class homework. A possible recommendation to improve achievement is an extra class time for doing homework. Another implication is math educators, first-year workshops, and textbooks could teach the skills necessary for students to create suitable time management schedules and strategies that support students' course goals.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
ix, 116 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Stephen Peter Gramlich
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gramlich
NamePart (type = given)
Stephen Peter
Role
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author
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Stephen Gramlich
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smith
NamePart (type = given)
Jeffrey K.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Jeffrey K. Smith
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Weber
NamePart (type = given)
Keith
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Keith Weber
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Remshard
NamePart (type = given)
Michael
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Michael Remshard
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38G8KSS
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Gramlich
GivenName
Stephen
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-23 18:23:55
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Stephen Gramlich
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
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application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
952320
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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