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The serpent in the Garden State

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
The serpent in the Garden State
SubTitle
juvenile delinquency in 1920s New Jersey
Identifier
ETD_2569
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001500001.ETD.000052904
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1)
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Educational Administration and Supervision
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Juvenile delinquency--New Jersey--20th century
Abstract
School administrators, educators, psychologists, social workers, the juvenile courts, institutional reformers, and others shape the manner in which children are labeled, portrayed, and treated. However, the agendas, motivations, political language, and influence of these "helping professionals" in "treating" and "reforming" juvenile delinquents have rarely been scrutinized. Multiple other factors which contour the lives of so-called juvenile delinquents have also gone largely unexamined. These include: the context of the era; the importance of testing and measurement on delinquency; the consequences of labeling; the influence of the juvenile court; the motives and practices of the public school; the agendas of institutional reformers; and the current beliefs about cutting edge treatments. All of these factors collectively and concurrently shape the lives of so-called delinquent children. Because juvenile delinquency data are generally unreliable, inquiries other than quantitative studies are needed to advance knowledge about juvenile delinquency. Little new knowledge about the "causes" or "solutions" to the complex problem of juvenile delinquency have been offered in the last 90 years, and many practitioners who approach the modern day issue of juvenile delinquency fail to appreciate that the seemingly new problem is truly an old one with new contextual variations. In an attempt to address this problem, I answered the following question: how was juvenile delinquency defined, portrayed, and addressed by would-be-reformers in New Jersey during the 1920s? This historical dissertation was conducted using a "New History" perspective. By examining a myriad of intersecting histories with a fluid Venn diagram as a lens, this study reconstructed the history of juvenile delinquency in 1920s New Jersey. These histories included the context of the 1920s; the "political language" of the budding helping professions; the development of the New Jersey juvenile court; the role of New Jersey public schools during the Twenties; the development of the New Jersey Department of Institutions and Agencies, the State Home for Boys in Jamesburg, and The Training School at Vineland; and the deadly practices of Dr. Henry Cotton at the State Hospital in Trenton. By examining these disparate themes in isolation and subsequently formulating and developing theories on how they were interrelated or interdependent, I attempted to reconstruct the history of this topic. The examination of the definition, portrayal, and treatment of juvenile delinquency in 1920s New Jersey has hopefully provided a rich historical study of a problem that is seemingly unique to the present day. Current educators, educational administrators, and others concerned with the problem of juvenile delinquency should be able to use the framework of this dissertation as a lens through which they may examine juvenile delinquency from multiple vantage points and assess the manner in which delinquency is currently being defined, portrayed, and addressed. Modern educators and school administrators will hopefully examine the formal and informal labels they are currently affixing to individual and groups of children and contemplate how their personal, professional, and institutional efforts shape the fates of these students.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xi, 498 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note
Includes abstract
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
Thomas M. Ferry
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ferry
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas M.
NamePart (type = date)
1976-
Role
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author
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Thomas Ferry
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lugg
NamePart (type = given)
Catherine A.
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Catherine A. Lugg
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Liu
NamePart (type = given)
Edward
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Edward Liu
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Karpinski
NamePart (type = given)
Carol F.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Carol F. Karpinski
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3NS0V08
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ferry
GivenName
Thomas
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-11 00:26:56
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Thomas Ferry
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
3522560
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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