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An exploratory study of the perceived utility and effectiveness of state fusion centers

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
An exploratory study of the perceived utility and effectiveness of state fusion centers
Identifier
ETD_2664
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000052951
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Criminal Justice
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Intelligence service--United States
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Terrorism--United States--Prevention
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Criminal justice, Administration of--United States
Abstract (type = abstract)
After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the 9/11 Commission concluded that the nation's intelligence agencies had failed to "connect the dots," and improving the country's intelligence capabilities among all levels of government has been highly prioritized. While several federal initiatives were proposed to overcome "the wall" inhibiting information flow between agencies, a subfederal response was the establishment of fusion centers. Briefly, fusion centers are multiagency facilities tasked with improving the collection, analysis and dissemination of information and intelligence within the law enforcement community as well as between public and private sector partners. They are designed to maximize resources, streamline operations, and improve law enforcement's ability to fight crime and terrorism through all-source analysis and dissemination of information. Due to their relative newness, several issues currently remain unclear. Specifically, little research exists addressing whether fusion centers are fulfilling their intended functions, to what degree they have facilitated changes in how law enforcement understands and uses threat information, whether they are perceived effective, and whether they are innovative. Using case study design and qualitative methods, this study explored the perceived efficacy of fusion centers, using data collected from open-ended, semi-structured interviews and site visits. Using purposive and convenience sampling techniques, forty-nine (N=49) individuals offering a range of perspectives participated. Participants were solicited from, or affiliated with, four separate state fusion centers. In addition, individuals from key federal organizations and others with expert knowledge on the subject matter were interviewed for this research. The study's findings indicate that while fusion centers are partially fulfilling their designated tasks, they continue to struggle with several challenges. Although they have improved law enforcement's information collection and sharing capabilities, they have yet to develop robust analytical capabilities, or to overcome other obstacles. Moreover, the findings from this study suggest that the threat of terrorism is perceived as neither paramount nor trivial to fusion centers; however, fusion centers are perceived as valuable resources to address other criminal threats. The findings from this research have important policy implications for practitioners, as well as being a source from which future research regarding fusion center's processes and products can be empirically designed.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xvi, 305 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Renee Dianne Graphia
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Graphia
NamePart (type = given)
Renee Dianne
NamePart (type = date)
1979-
Role
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author
DisplayForm
Renee Graphia
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Samuels
NamePart (type = given)
Norman
Role
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Norman Samuels
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kennedy
NamePart (type = given)
Leslie
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Leslie Kennedy
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Finckenauer
NamePart (type = given)
James
Role
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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James Finckenauer
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Carter
NamePart (type = given)
David
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
David Carter
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3BG2P4V
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Graphia
GivenName
Renee
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-25 22:06:23
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Renee Graphia
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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