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Adult attachment as a mediator/moderator to early experiences of family violence victimization on adult physically violent behavior

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Adult attachment as a mediator/moderator to early experiences of family violence victimization on adult physically violent behavior
Identifier
ETD_2673
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10002600001.ETD.000052953
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
English
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Criminal Justice
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Attachment behavior
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Family violence
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Intimate partner violence
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Violence
Abstract (type = abstract)
The detrimental effects of family violence victimization are well documented in research. Of particular note is its relationship to violent offending. Much evidence exists that link early experiences of family violence victimization to later violent behavior. Most often, researchers attribute this "cycle of violence" to social learning, whereby youth view and learn specific behaviors in response to conflict and then use them as adults. Yet this theory alone fails to explain why some individuals who experience family violence do not go on to offend later in life while others do. Attachment theory suggests that attachment forms early in life and is relatively stable over time and relationships. Individuals who experience family violence are more likely to have disrupted attachments that relate to later relationship problems. However, there is limited research investigating the role of attachment in influencing adult violence. This study takes a multidimensional approach by investigating whether several types of childhood experiences of family violence relate to adult violence via adult attachment, including attachment to a best friend, an intimate, a parent, and a sibling. Using a convenience sample of undergraduate university students, data was collected from 372 respondents through self-administered questionnaires during the fall semester of 2009. Two different sets of multivariate analyses were used to estimate whether adult attachment types play a role in explaining adult violence: (1) nested models to analyze the independent effect of each adult attachment type on the relationship between family violence and adult violent behavior, and (2) models using main effects and interactions between family violence-adult attachment types on adult violent behavior. Consistent with past research, the results of the analyses revealed significant associations between direct experiences of family violence victimization and adult violent behavior that provided support for social learning theory. Multivariate analyses using interaction terms also found significant interactions, indicating moderation effects, which were further investigated. Given the current study's findings on the role of adult attachment in interacting with experiences of family violence and its relation to adult violent behavior, further research to examine the means by which family violence victimization experiences develop into violent behavioral patterns is recommended.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xi, 176 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Alison J. Marganski
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Marganski
NamePart (type = given)
Alison J.
NamePart (type = date)
1983-
Role
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author
DisplayForm
Alison Marganski
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Veysey
NamePart (type = given)
Bonita M.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Bonita M. Veysey
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Maxfield
NamePart (type = given)
Michael G.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Michael G. Maxfield
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kennedy
NamePart (type = given)
Leslie W.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Leslie W. Kennedy
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Boxer
NamePart (type = given)
Paul
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Paul Boxer
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3KW5G4T
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Marganski
GivenName
Alison
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-29 08:41:31
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Alison Marganski
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1228800
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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