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A classical test theory and item response theory analysis of the DSM-IV symptom criteria for a major depressive episode using data from the National Comorbidity Survey--Replication

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
A classical test theory and item response theory analysis of the DSM-IV symptom criteria for a major depressive episode using data from the National Comorbidity Survey--Replication
Identifier
ETD_2639
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053148
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Education
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Item response theory
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Psychometrics
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Depression, Mental--Diagnosis
Abstract (type = abstract)
Formal psychiatric symptom criteria are used to delineate the boundary between “normal” and “abnormal” behavior. In North America, the current official psychodiagnostic criteria for a multitude of psychiatric disorders are codified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th Edition, text revision) (APA, 2000). Psychodiagnostic symptom criteria are indicators of psychopathological constructs that are clearly latent, however, it is somewhat astonishing that formal psychometric techniques that have been developed to model latent constructs have not been used to develop and evaluate psychodiagnostic symptom criteria (Aggen, Neale, & Kendler, 2005; Zimmerman, McGlinchey, Young, & Chelminski, 2006a, 2006b). There are two main psychometric paradigms that are currently in use: classical test theory and item response theory (Crocker & Algina, 1986). Classical test theory has been extensively used on both cognitive constructs and noncognitive constructs (Crocker & Algina, 1986; Embretson & Hershberger, 1999). Item response theory is considered to be theoretically superior to classical test theory and it has revolutionized the creation and evaluation of cognitive constructs (Crocker & Algina, 1986; Embretson & Hershberger, 1999; McDonald, 1999). However, item response theory has not been extensively utilized for the creation and evaluation of noncognitive constructs, even though it holds great promise in this regard (Reise, 1999; Reise & Henson, 2003). The proposed study will use classical test theory and item response theory to assess the psychodiagnostic symptom criteria for depression as found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th Edition, text revision) (APA, 2000). The data to be used in the proposed study was collected in the National Comorbidity Survey – Replication, which was a nationally representative epidemiological community survey (Kessler et al., 2004; Kessler & Merikangas, 2004). The results of such a study will give a sophisticated psychometric perspective on the psychodiagnostic symptom criteria of depression that has not yet been available and it will provide valuable information on improving and refining future diagnostic symptom criteria of depression.
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
Extent
ix, 135 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Anthony P. Pawlak
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pawlak
NamePart (type = given)
Anthony P.
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author
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Anthony Pawlak
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
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Penfield
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Douglas A
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Douglas A Penfield
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Camilli
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Gregory
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Gregory Camilli
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NamePart (type = family)
Tomlinson-Clarke
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Saundra
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Saundra Tomlinson-Clarke
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Langenbucher
NamePart (type = given)
James
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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James Langenbucher
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
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degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Location
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NjNbRU
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3T153QF
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Pawlak
GivenName
Anthony
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-15 16:43:57
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Anthony Pawlak
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
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License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent (ID = RE-2); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Embargo
DateTime
2010-05-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2012.
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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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1269760
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