Staff View
Physiological, biochemical and molecular factors associated with heat tolerance in bentgrass (Agrostis spp.)

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Physiological, biochemical and molecular factors associated with heat tolerance in bentgrass (Agrostis spp.)
Identifier
ETD_2543
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.2/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053223
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Plant Biology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Agrostis--Molecular aspects
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Plants--Effect of heat on
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Proteomics
Abstract (type = abstract)
High temperature is a major factor limiting the growth of cool-season plant species during summer. Understanding mechanisms of plant tolerance to high temperature would help develop effective management practices and heat-tolerant cultivars through breeding or biotechnology. This dissertation research explored physiological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms for improving heat tolerance in two bentgrass species, creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.), a widely used cool-season grass species on golf course tees and putting greens, and thermal rough bentgrass (Agrostis scabra Willd.) adapted to geothermal areas in Yellowstone National Park. The dissertation reports research in three main components. The first section compared differential heat-induced metabolism of hormones, proteins and metabolites between heat-sensitive creeping bentgrass and heat-tolerant A. scabra. Based on the findings that heat tolerance of bentgrass was associated with changes in stress-related hormone levels, the effects of foliar-applied hormone or hormone inhibitors on creeping bentgrass to enhance heat tolerance were further studied. Results from both growth chamber and field studies confirmed the effectiveness of applying hormones or hormone-based plant growth regulators on alleviating heat injuries in creeping bentgrass. In the last part of the dissertation, a few transgenic creeping bentgrass lines with improved heat tolerance were characterized. These transgenic lines carry a gene (ipt) controlling cytokinin synthesis. Increased ipt gene expression and cytokinin levels were confirmed and changes in morphological and physiological traits of the plants were examined. Genome-wide protein responses to the addition of the gene and their association with heat tolerance were discussed. The results indicated that transformation with the ipt gene induced protein changes involved in multiple functional groups, mainly in energy, protein destination and storage, and disease/defense categories in both leaves and roots of creeping bentgrass, thus cytokinins may have regulatory roles in multiple metabolic pathways for heat tolerance. Taken together, these studies suggest summer performance of creeping bentgrass may be improved by properly applying hormone-based plant growth regulators or biostimulants, and incorporating molecular markers developed from heat- and/or hormone-responsive proteins and metabolites may facilitate selection of heat-tolerant creeping bentgrass cultivars.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xvi, 269 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Yan Xu
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Xu
NamePart (type = given)
Yan
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Yan Xu
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Huang
NamePart (type = given)
Bingru
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Bingru Huang
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gianfagna
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Thomas Gianfagna
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Belanger
NamePart (type = given)
Faith
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Faith Belanger
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hurley
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Richard Hurley
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38915ZP
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Xu
GivenName
Yan
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-07 13:40:20
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Yan Xu
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Back to the top

Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
2570240
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
962d286a1a6ab56093438b8e03d50d92f59350be
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021