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Trans-imperial mediations of the 'Turk'

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Trans-imperial mediations of the 'Turk'
SubTitle
early modern depictions of Ottoman encounter in English drama and non-fiction prose
Identifier
ETD_2613
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053347
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literatures in English
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Turks in literature
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mediation in literature
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
English drama
Abstract (type = abstract)
My dissertation will examine the role of the trans-imperial mediator in facilitating literary and cultural interactions between England and the Ottoman Empire in the early modern period. I define „trans-imperial mediator‟ to mean those travelers who shuttled between England and the Ottoman Empire, on behalf of their employers, for trade, intelligence-gathering, or diplomatic exchange. I argue that these mediators fashioned depictions of the Turk in response to their own trans-imperial anxieties. They imagined themselves to be aliens among the Ottoman subjects whom they encountered daily, despite sharing more in common with these Ottomans than the countrymen to whom they addressed their writing. At the same time, they felt equally uncertain about the prospects of returning home and being accepted as Englishmen, despite their assertions to the contrary. The identity that they created for themselves - Englishmen who were distinctly different from „the Turk‟ - must be understood as a response to their multiple identities and complex obligations. I argue that the „Turk‟ that these mediators introduced to English audiences must also be read as a composite creation – an imaginative response to the obligations of serving English interests while trying to live among the Ottomans. English playwrights recognized the creative opportunities allowed by dramatizing the polyvalent figure of the trans-imperial mediator to fashion their own types of Turks. Dramatists recognized the unique conjunctions between the vilified trans-imperial mediator and the Turk by using the play space to „recover‟ the imagined voice of the mediator and interrogate what anxieties occasioned the creation of particular types of Turk. English dramatists also introduced the figure of the trans-imperial mediator to a sympathetic audience – those discontented Englishmen who imagined escaping from the limiting social and economic conditions at home. Through lending the trans-imperial mediator a voice of his/her own, English „Turk‟ plays can be interpreted anew as interpretive paradigms for understanding how mediation functioned literarily in non-fiction accounts. Once we consider the shared investments that linked English trans-imperial mediators to their fictionalized counterparts, we may better understand why particular images of the 'Turk‟ must be interpreted through a web of domestic anxieties.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
v, 247 p.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ameer Sohrawardy
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sohrawardy
NamePart (type = given)
Ameer
NamePart (type = date)
1971-
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author
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Ameer Sohrawardy
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Levao
NamePart (type = given)
Ronald
Role
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Ronald Levao
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Miller
NamePart (type = given)
Jacqueline
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Jacqueline Miller
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bartels
NamePart (type = given)
Emily
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Emily Bartels
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Vitkus
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Daniel Vitkus
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3G73DS8
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Sohrawardy
GivenName
Ameer
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-14 22:44:21
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Ameer Sohrawardy
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent (ID = RE-2); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Embargo
DateTime
2010-05-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after November 30th, 2010.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
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application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1136640
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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