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Ecological difference and the ecology of subjectivization in sixteenth century non-fiction travel narrative to the Caribbean

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Ecological difference and the ecology of subjectivization in sixteenth century non-fiction travel narrative to the Caribbean
Identifier
ETD_2643
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053413
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Comparative Literature
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Travel in literature--History--16th century
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Ecology in literature
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Nature in literature
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Latin America--In literature--History--16th century
Abstract (type = abstract)
This study seeks to identify and analyze the representation of Amerindian ecology or relationship to nature found in sixteenth century nonfiction travel narratives to the Caribbean. The purpose of the study is first, to explore the textual representation of Amerindian ecology as a type of cultural difference, and second, to uncover the link between said representation and the textual construction of the European traveler writer as a modern subject. The main argument is that the colonial discourse of the sixteenth century travel narrative to the Caribbean features an ecological difference that is constitutive of European modern subjectivity within the text. Ecological difference is seen as the textual representation and production of cultural difference articulated in ecological terms or those that refer to the human/nature relation. Following Jean Joseph Goux's critique of the Freudian-Lacanian model for the process of the construction of modern subjectivity, subjectivization is shown to occur textually and to imply a specific ecology befitting the colonial and capitalist context of the 1500's. The term ecology of subjectivization emerges as a useful term pointing to the significance of the human to nature relation in the process of the textual construction of the subject. Methodologically, the study hinges on the identification and analysis of the travel narrative's colonial discourse relating to ecology and the imperial subject. The texts studied are various nonfiction travel narratives from the 1500's, but discussion centers on Cabeza de Vaca's Naufragios (1542), Walter Ralegh's Discoverie (1596), Jean de Léry's Histoire (1578), and Ramón Pané's Relación (1498). Chapters offer close readings of the depictions of indigenous ecological philosophies and practices, images of nakedness and cannibalism, and instances of conscious manipulations of the representation of the self. Throughout the discussion of these images, the textual construction of the traveler as subject and the other and his environment as object is fleshed out. Moreover, since these travel narratives were written with the express purpose of attaining improved legal or political status within the colonial system, the technology of writing is revealed as the best means to control not only the nature but also the body of the Caribbean other.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
vii, 229 p.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Patricia Ferrer-Medina
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ferrer-Medina
NamePart (type = given)
Patricia
NamePart (type = date)
1975-
Role
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author
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Patricia Ferrer-Medina
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Marcone
NamePart (type = given)
Jorge T
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Jorge T Marcone
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Diamond
NamePart (type = given)
Josephine
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Josephine Diamond
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Martinez-San Miguel
NamePart (type = given)
Yolanda
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Yolanda Martinez-San Miguel
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Verdesio
NamePart (type = given)
Gustavo
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Gustavo Verdesio
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T34X57VN
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ferrer-Medina
GivenName
Patricia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-15 17:29:16
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Patricia Ferrer-Medina
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent (ID = RE-2); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Embargo
DateTime
2010-05-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2012.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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1085440
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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