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The darling strangers and English appetites

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
The darling strangers and English appetites
SubTitle
technology transfer and European cultural barriers in the early modern Atlantic world
Identifier
ETD_2656
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053486
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
History
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Technology transfer--England
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Technology transfer--New Netherland
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Ethnology
Abstract (type = abstract)
The English had the opportunity to serve an apprenticeship for technologies they desired in the early modern period on both sides of the Atlantic. In places such as London or Norwich highly mobile stranger artisans from northern continental Europe created the items for which the English had an appetite, whether sugar or clothes, saw mills or city docks. In the colonies the "darlings" who possessed the skills that the English envied were principally in New Netherland, records showing that they were from the same cultural group of northern continental Europeans who resided as guild strangers in English cities. Family reconstitution revealed the mobility of these skilled artisans in the Atlantic World. North American colonial documents provide a window through which to view when, how, or if, the English managed to acquire the skilled knowledge of cultural outsiders to produce what they coveted. Every examined case of an English appetite for a product or its means of production proved to possess features unique to the circumstances of the interaction between the English and those of another European culture practicing the skill. In most cases deep cultural differences limited the colonial English to hiring foreign experts, buying their products, or finding culturally acceptable sources of information such as the Scots. Occasionally artisans were hired directly from the continent of Europe using colonial middlemen. English citizenship was easier to obtain in the colonies than in England, offering a colonial back door to foreign craft practice that could re-cross the Atlantic to an English town or city. The problems that made England's apprenticeship so difficult became apparent when examining Atlantic World technology transfer and its barriers. There were distinct, deep cultural differences between the English and the northern continental Europeans in mobility, kinship systems, naming practices, family, language, inheritance patterns, views of women, craft practice and values, attitudes toward machines, and concepts of urban life. These acted as barriers to the transfer of technologies including higher craft skills, saw mills, and city building.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xi, 299 p. : ill., map
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Elva Kathleen Lyon
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lyon
NamePart (type = given)
Elva Kathleen
Role
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author
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Elva Lyon
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Israel
NamePart (type = given)
Paul
Role
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Paul Israel
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Delbourgo
NamePart (type = given)
James
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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James Delbourgo
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bellany
NamePart (type = given)
Alastair
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Alastair Bellany
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kloek
NamePart (type = given)
Els
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Els Kloek
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Location
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NjNbRU
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3NZ87Q0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Lyon
GivenName
Elva
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-19 14:04:27
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Elva Lyon
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent (ID = RE-2); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Embargo
DateTime
2010-05-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2012.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
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application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
6123520
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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