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Effects of drying methods on the stability of 2, 4-decadienal encapsulated in an o/w nanoemulsion

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Effects of drying methods on the stability of 2, 4-decadienal encapsulated in an o/w nanoemulsion
Identifier
ETD_2574
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053566
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Food Science
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Food additives industry--Production standards
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Food additives industry
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Flavor--Biotechnology
Abstract (type = abstract)
The flavor industry has utilized many encapsulation methods in order to provide customers with stable flavors that maintain their integrity during various processing procedures. Savory flavors in particular have a unique hurdle to overcome, as they are subject to extreme temperature abuse, such as frying, baking, sautéing, and boiling. Highly sensitive compounds such as 2,4-Decadienal, that provide distinct characteristics to savory foods such as french fries and chicken, are particularly susceptible to change during these processes. Using oil in water nanoemulstions of diameters between 20-800 nanometers as well as various drying methods to encapsulate volatile compounds have been an exciting avenue for flavor encapsulation. The present research will focus on the stability of 2,4-Decadienal using oil in water nanoparticles of medium chain triglycerides (Neobee) in addition to multilayer encapsulation; spray drying and freeze drying. A slurry of 2,4-decadienal, maltodextrin, gum, Neobee and water were homogenized via high speed at 13,500 rpm and high pressure under 1500 bar to create a stable nanoemulsion. Half of the emulsion was then spray dried, while the remaining emulsion was freeze dried. Powdered finished samples were stored at 5°C (refrigeration), 25°C (ambient), 40°C (summer day), and 60°C (abuse/accelerated) for thirty days. Gas Chromatography with a flame ionization detector was used to measure ppm levels of 2,4-Decadienal in samples on appointed days. Mass Chromatography was then used to determine degradation compounds. Freeze-dried samples yielded the best protection against oxidation, retro-aldol condensation, and over all degradation by as much as 50% amongst the widest range of shelf life temperatures. Higher temperature storage allowed twice as much development of degradation products, such as 2-octenal, hexanal, octanoic acid, hexanoic acid, and 2-nonenal compared to refrigerated storage. Freeze dried encapsulation faired the best at refrigeration temperatures due to its crystalline structure. Medium chain triglycerides nanoparticles proved to be beneficial in retaining volatile compounds in conjunction with freeze drying. The higher heat, the longer the holding time, and the larger amount of oxygen present, accelerated 2,4-decadienal degradation in any encapsulation method. This study found that freeze drying a lipid nanoparticle with a volatile aldehyde, proved to be superior in retaining and preventing degradation compared to that of spray drying. Overall, the encapsulated samples retained 2,4-Decadienal significantly better than the unprotected reference. Future studies using various solid lipids should be examined.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
x, 57 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note
Includes abstract
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Diana Y. Lee
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lee
NamePart (type = given)
Diana
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
Role
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author
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DIANA LEE
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
HUANG
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QINGRONG
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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QINGRONG HUANG
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lee
NamePart (type = given)
Tung-Ching
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
co-chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Tung-Ching Lee
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
HO
NamePart (type = given)
CHI-TANG
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
co-chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
CHI-TANG HO
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3BP02V4
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
LEE
GivenName
DIANA
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-12 12:31:45
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
DIANA LEE
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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1566720
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