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Large format and mediation of the natural world

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Large format and mediation of the natural world
SubTitle
vision, technology and the sublime
Identifier
ETD_2602
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000053610
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Nature in motion pictures
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Nature cinematography
Abstract (type = abstract)
Large format films, specifically those associated with science centers, museums and historical sites, offer a visual experience that engages the viewer through an immersive, engaging response to the large images. Commonly referenced as IMAX® films, these films come closest to the total cinema posited by Bazin which would offer a complete representation of the world. The strict display requirement for these films has resulted in their association with institutional venues and implicates them in the dissemination of ideology and cultural knowledges. Through a multimethod critical cultural analysis of production (political economy), text (close reading combining a textual and shot by shot analyses), and audience response (content analysis) to the large format film Yellowstone, the research presented here asked, "How are nature, Yellowstone National Park, and the National Park System represented in this large format film?", "Where does the large format presentation of nature and the national parks fall in the continuum of representations of nature?", and "How are nature, the Yellowstone National Park, and the National Park System presented and constructed" in large format in consequence of the medium itself and through the medium's relationship as a "truth" format aligned with museums, science centers and historical sites? Analyzed through a consideration of the theories of ideology and the sublime, research pointed to the complicated relationship between director and funders in the construction of the film, with choices for content being driven by economic concerns for the public's response to the film. The film was shown to reflect the ideology of pristine America linked to the myths of Western expansion through its depiction of the myth of archetypal America. Due to the technological limitations of the medium which created a sublime experience, the viewer was positioned within an ideological space as separate and apart from nature, of knowing but not experiencing, of seeing but never fully understanding the natural world. By celebrating the power to dominate nature in the elimination of the connection to nature, Yellowstone represents an extension of the American technological sublime.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
viii, 164 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Mary L. Nucci
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Nucci
NamePart (type = given)
Mary
NamePart (type = date)
1958-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Mary Nucci
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pavlik
NamePart (type = given)
John V.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
John V. Pavlik
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Steiner
NamePart (type = given)
Linda
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Linda Steiner
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bratich
NamePart (type = given)
Jack
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Jack Bratich
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Belton
NamePart (type = given)
John
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
John Belton
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3JH3M7Z
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Nucci
GivenName
Mary
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-04-14 16:04:10
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Mary Nucci
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
942080
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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