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Network rebuilding after disaster

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Network rebuilding after disaster
SubTitle
a communication theory of transitional space
Identifier
ETD_1677
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000054807
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Business networks
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Communication in industrial relations
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Information theory
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation develops a communication theory of transitional space. The focus of this theory is on how business leaders use communication to rebuild interorganizational networks following a large-scale disruption. The premise of a communication theory of transitional space is that a large-scale disruption creates a space in which conditions are neither what they were before the disruption nor where they need to be in order for business to resume with a sense of normalcy. The way business leaders communicate in this space leads to the creation of transitional networks, or networks that enable business leaders to navigate this space. Propositions are tested in the field and with an online survey of New Orleans’ business and organizational leaders whose businesses and professional networks, and physical environments, were affected by Hurricane Katrina. The dissertation begins by establishing crisis as a context for transitional space. Next, an examination of social network theory and constitutive communication using Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) provide the theoretical framework for the study. Data were analyzed using a combination of grounded theory and social network analysis. Patterns of communication and social structure emerged that reflect a two-stage transitional space, which is marked by an altered macro-structure and dysfunctional communication infrastructure. Resource exchange and reconnecting with previous network members drives initial communication in a transitional space. This communication is facilitated by an alternative communication infrastructure developed by business leaders through the use of ICTs. Findings from this study further understanding of the lifecycle of networks by providing a longitudinal view of network development, as well as further network research in areas such as disaster recovery and organizational crisis. Theoretical implications include an emphasis on the importance of drawing a distinction between interaction and communication in social networks, as well as a theoretical context for the interplay of communication and structure following a disaster. The importance of ICTs in repairing communication infrastructures, as well as the importance of “helping” organizations in facilitating trust and collective action, both have theoretical and applied implications for social networks and disaster recovery.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
ix, 188 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note
Includes abstract
Note
Vita
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Lisa Volk Chewning
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Chenwning
NamePart (type = given)
Lisa
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author
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Lisa Chenwning
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Doerfel
NamePart (type = given)
Marya L
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Marya L Doerfel
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Katz
NamePart (type = given)
James
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
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Advisory Committee
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James Katz
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Aakhus
NamePart (type = given)
Mark
Role
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Mark Aakhus
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Harrison
NamePart (type = given)
Tyler R
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Tyler R Harrison
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2009
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2009
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3J67GVS
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Chenwning
GivenName
Lisa
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2009-04-14 09:14:25
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Lisa Chenwning
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
2252800
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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