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Safety behaviors, compulsive behaviors, and therapist extensiveness as predictors of outcome in behavior for youth OCD

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Safety behaviors, compulsive behaviors, and therapist extensiveness as predictors of outcome in behavior for youth OCD
Identifier
ETD_1857
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001800001.ETD.000055939
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Exposure therapy
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Behavior therapy for teenagers
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Behavior therapy for children
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Obsessive-compulsive disorder in adolescence--Treatment
Subject (ID = SBJ-6); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Obsessive-compulsive disorder in children--Treatment
Abstract (type = abstract)
The efficacy of behavior therapy in treating adult OCD is well-documented and early trials in youth populations are encouraging (March et al., 1994; Piacentini et al., 2002; POTS Team, 2004), however, residual symptoms often persist. The study of process variables can provide suggestions for improving the development, delivery, and outcomes of psychological therapies (Kazdin & Nock, 2003). One potentially important variant in exposure procedures identified by the literature has been the use of safety behaviors. However, it has been difficult to draw conclusions regarding the effect of safety behaviors on OCD treatment because the term has been interpreted broadly across studies and results have been mixed. The current study uses observational coding of existing data to assess three predictors of outcome within two early exposure sessions and two late exposure sessions of a manualized exposure and response prevention program. Participants include 43 youth (ages 8 – 17 years) diagnosed with a principal OCD diagnosis who received a 12-week exposure and response prevention program. Predictors assessed via observational coding include safety behaviors (avoidance and escape), compulsive behaviors, and therapist extensiveness (therapist ability to engage the client in difficult exposures). Outcome was measured by symptom report (CY-BOCS) at midtreatment and post-treatment. It was hypothesized that higher average occurrence of safety and compulsive behaviors during exposure tasks would predict higher OCD symptoms while lower ratings of therapist extensiveness would predict higher OCD symptoms at mid-treatment and post-treatment. Interaction effects were also investigated. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated a significant relationship between safety behaviors exhibited during the early exposure phase and OCD symptoms at mid-treatment in the expected direction, B = 0.31, t = 2.09, p<.05, R2=.25. However, safety behavior in the late phase was not related to OCD symptoms at post-treatment nor was safety behavior throughout treatment significantly related to OCD symptoms at posttreatment. Significant findings involving compulsive behaviors, therapist extensiveness, and interaction effects did not emerge. Methodological limitations, such as restricted range of the independent variables and the need for a more frequently administered dependent variable, and recommendations for future studies are discussed.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
ix, 62 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Daniela Colognori
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Colognori
NamePart (type = given)
Daniela
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Daniela Colognori
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chu
NamePart (type = given)
Brian C
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Brian C Chu
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rockmore
NamePart (type = given)
Lori
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Lori Rockmore
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T34J0DXX
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Colognori
GivenName
Daniela
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2009-05-15 20:35:08
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Daniela Colognori
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
174080
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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