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Tipping toward change

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Tipping toward change
SubTitle
factors associated with pre-treatment drinking cessation in women with alcohol dependence
Identifier
ETD_2989
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001800001.ETD.000055940
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Alcoholism--Treatment
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Women alcoholics
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Women--Substance abuse--Treatment
Abstract (type = abstract)
Objective: Psychosocial treatment research is shifting from a focus on randomized clinical trials to evaluating mechanisms of change. Researchers are interested in change mechanisms specific to certain treatments, across treatments and even those that occur outside of treatment. One phenomenon, sometimes called “assessment reactivity,” is change that occurs during the pre-treatment assessment period of clinical studies. For instance, Epstein et al. (2005) found that 45% of the women in an outpatient treatment for alcohol dependence became abstinent before treatment began. This dissertation further investigated possible mechanisms predicting the pre-treatment drinking cessation occurring in that study. Method: Alcohol dependent women (n=102) participated in a study of 6 months of individual or couple CBT for alcohol use disorders. The current study examined demographic, drinking severity, psychopathology, motivation, and partner/relationship variables to determine which significantly predicted pre-treatment abstinence. Results: Four variables differentiated pre-treatment abstinent from non-abstinent women: percent of days abstinent prior to the Telephone Screen, having a goal of abstinence, women’s ratings of benefits of drinking cessation and their ratings of costs. A multivariate logistic regression with all four predictors was conducted to determine their relative importance in predicting pre-treatment abstinence when controlling for the effects of the other predictors. Results from the logistic regression analysis indicated that more pre-Telephone Screen days abstinent and higher ratings of the benefits of drinking cessation and lower ratings of perceived costs were significantly associated with an increased likelihood for pre-treatment abstinence between Baseline and session 1 of treatment. Having a goal of abstinence did not predict women’s pretreatment abstinence when controlling for the effects of the other factors. Conclusions: Change was occurring before women made contact with the study and is not exclusively linked to assessment reactivity. The fact that a high rating of the benefits of change in particular, but also a low rating of costs were strong predictors of actual change, provides further evidence that making positive cognitive shifts toward change may be one of the most important mechanisms of behavior change.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
ix, 76 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Claudia Cumes
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Cumes
NamePart (type = given)
Claudia
NamePart (type = date)
1970-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Claudia Cumes
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Epstein
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Elizabeth Epstein
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gantwerk
NamePart (type = given)
Lewis
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Lewis Gantwerk
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38915NN
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Cumes
GivenName
Claudia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-10-02 13:13:41
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Claudia Cumes
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
512000
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
fa385fab5d10a35f4b9b5e19e91da4b20278ad4f
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