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The treatment of Gulf War syndrome with cognitive behavioral therapy

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
The treatment of Gulf War syndrome with cognitive behavioral therapy
SubTitle
a case comparison study
Identifier
ETD_2914
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001800001.ETD.000055946
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Behavior therapy
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Persian Gulf syndrome--Treatment
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Persian Gulf War, 1991--Veterans--Mental health--Case studies
Abstract
Since the late 1990s, researchers have been focused on finding effective treatments for military veterans with Gulf War Syndrome (GWS), a multisymptom (cognitive and physical) illness whose roots have still remained largely unexplained. With the possibility that such war-related syndromes may affect as many as 45-60% of returning soldiers, researchers have recommended that future research on GWS prioritize qualitative work, which has been scarce, to deepen the understanding of this illness in the veteran population -- including their attributions, fears, and concerns -- so that more refined, suitable treatments may be developed to meet their needs. The following paper examines a prior treatment study which evaluated the efficacy of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to improve physical health and reduce psychological stress in military veterans with GWS. The current analysis is comprised of a cross-case comparison of two soldiers and considers the various factors that may have contributed to the success or failure of this particular CBT treatment for this population. In the original treatment trial, patients were given weekly individual outpatient therapy sessions over a three-month period and were monitored periodically for physical, cognitive, and emotional changes. Two cases were selected for analysis from the original study based on their opposing outcomes: Soldier 2 was successful in achieving a substantial increase in physical functioning, while Soldier 1 was not. Although the CBT treatment yielded positive changes in both patients’ level of self-awareness, and significant improvements in GWS-related psychological and physical stress in Soldier 2's case, the results indicate that additional factors, such as individual personality traits, states of cognitive functioning, and comorbidity need to be more closely examined and considered when designing treatments for veterans with Gulf War Syndrome.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
viii, 107 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Charlotte Alexandra Labys
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Labys
NamePart (type = given)
Charlotte Alexandra
NamePart (type = date)
1972-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Charlotte Labys
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fishman
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel B.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Daniel B. Fishman
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Indart
NamePart (type = given)
Monica
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Monica Indart
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chandler
NamePart (type = given)
Helena
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Helena Chandler
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3X63MR0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Labys
GivenName
Charlotte
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-09-27 14:24:28
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Charlotte Labys
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
624640
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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