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Attachment style and somatization

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Attachment style and somatization
SubTitle
a multimethod approach to measuring the effect of emotional awareness
Identifier
ETD_2998
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10002600001.ETD.000056097
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Somatization disorder--Treatment
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Alexithymia
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Attachment disorder
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social phobia
Subject (ID = SBJ-6); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Somatoform disorders
Abstract (type = abstract)
The effect of attachment style on emotional awareness and somatization was examined using both self-report and implicit measures of negative affect. Attachment style and alexithymia were found play important roles in predicting the severity of somatic complaints independent of other indicators of negative affect. The significant interaction between alexithymia and attachment style indicated that alexithymics with a preoccupied attachment style are at the greatest risk of suffering from somatization. Follow up studies were conducted to measure the differential impact of attachment style on emotional awareness, a construct that has been previously linked to somatization. An anxiety-anger Implicit Association Test (IAT) was designed as a way to measure these negative emotions implicitly. Correlational analyses of both self-report and IAT responses of anxiety and anger grouped by attachment style revealed that the preoccupied attachment style is associated with the highest levels of emotional self-awareness while the dismissive attachment style is associated with the lowest levels. The effect of attachment style on emotional self-awareness was also revealed to be much greater in the presence of a stressor. In the final study, preliminary evidence of construct validity for the anxiety-anger IAT was established using a multi-trait multi-method correlational analysis. There was much greater convergent validity for implicit measures of anxiety compared to anger. In addition, an empirically derived construct labeled Emotional Unawareness and Evaluative Concern (EUEC) was shown to be an important moderator of anxiety when predicting somatization, with EUEC leading to greater levels of somatic complaints only under conditions of high anxiety. Implications for these findings leading to possible alternative treatments for somatization are discussed.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
viii, 147 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Daniel DePaulo
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
DePaulo
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Daniel DePaulo
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Harber
NamePart (type = given)
Kent
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Kent Harber
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kressel
NamePart (type = given)
Ken
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Ken Kressel
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Boxer
NamePart (type = given)
Paul
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Paul Boxer
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Siegel
NamePart (type = given)
Harold
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Harold Siegel
Name (ID = NAME-6); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Reich
NamePart (type = given)
Warren
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Warren Reich
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3VQ32GB
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
DePaulo
GivenName
Daniel
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-10-08 10:13:26
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Daniel DePaulo
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1044480
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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