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Situated knowledge and fungal conservation

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Situated knowledge and fungal conservation
SubTitle
morel mushroom management in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States
Identifier
ETD_2814
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056150
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Geography
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Morels--Conservation
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Fungi conservation
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Natural resources--Management
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Political ecology
Abstract (type = abstract)
Fungi are a mega-diverse group of organisms, currently estimated at 1.5 million species, yet their conservation has attracted little attention. Beginning in the mid-1980s in Europe, and the mid-1990s in the United States, fungal management and conservation discourses have developed noticeably in the last ten years. Reported declines in true morels (Morchella sp.) in the early 2000s raised concerns about overharvesting by visitors to national parks in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., where morel collecting is a popular and long-standing activity. In this dissertation, I explore this confluence of events, and ask: why is the conservation of this mega-diverse group of organisms emerging now, how is this happening, and what are the effects? Drawing on critical and poststructural perspectives on discourse and knowledge, I examine the ways in which fungal conservation emulates existing conservation discourses based on expert knowledge, state regulated land management, and capital investment. Like other biological scientists, mycologists emphasize biodiversity protection, data accumulation, and regulations for conservation and sustainable exploitation of fungal resources. Data on current and emerging fungal conservation discourses were collected using a mixed methods approach, including interviews with stakeholders and participant observation at three mycological meetings. Ecological knowledge, opinions, and relationships among mycologists, managers and long-term harvesters, vis-à-vis management and conservation, were examined. Finally, an ecological assessment based on harvester ecological knowledge demonstrates the integration of different methodological approaches. Shifting from studying accumulated scientific knowledge to examining the ways and places in which scientists create such knowledge emphasizes the practice of knowledge production. Managers and harvesters also produce knowledge and practices relevant for conservation. Participants’ biological and ecological knowledge is the epistemological foundation for their approach to fungal conservation; and these emerging “models” seem to diverge based on stakeholder group membership. However, further analysis shows that some stakeholders share concerns regarding conservation that are consistent with a specific logic, rather than with their group identity. These processes of analysis and documentation acknowledge and disrupt uniform truth regimes, giving voice to those that have been traditionally absent or marginalized in the formal protection and preservation of their own environments.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xvi, 249 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Elizabeth S. Barron
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Barron
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth S.
NamePart (type = date)
1975-
Role
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author
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Elizabeth Barron
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schroeder
NamePart (type = given)
Richard A.
Role
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Richard A. Schroeder
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Emery
NamePart (type = given)
Marla R.
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Marla R. Emery
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
St. Martin
NamePart (type = given)
Kevin
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Kevin St. Martin
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dighton
NamePart (type = given)
John
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
John Dighton
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3X066T0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Barron
GivenName
Elizabeth
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-08-17 10:40:41
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Elizabeth Barron
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
5335040
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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