Staff View
Breeding snowy plovers (Charadrius alexandrinus) exhibit variable response to human disturbance on two islands in southwest Florida

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Breeding snowy plovers (Charadrius alexandrinus) exhibit variable response to human disturbance on two islands in southwest Florida
Identifier
ETD_2781
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056322
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Snowy plover--Florida--Sanibel Island--Case studies
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Snowy plover--Florida--La Costa Islands--Case studies
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Snowy plover--Breeding
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Snowy plover--Effect of human beings on
Subject (ID = SBJ-6); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Bayesian statistical decision theory
Abstract (type = abstract)
Human disturbance has been implicated in population declines and decreased productivity in shorebirds, including the Snowy Plover, around the world. In this study, we examined the response of Snowy Plovers nesting on two islands in Southwest Florida, Sanibel and La Costa Islands, to human disturbance. We recorded flush distances and time spent off the nest for incubating birds in response to approach by a human on both Sanibel and La Costa, and for approach by a leashed dog on Sanibel only. We also recorded the first reaction distance of Snowy Plover adults and broods to approach by a human on both islands, and activity budgets of adults and chicks in the presence and absence of human activity. We conducted Bayesian analyses on all approach data. We used Principal Component Analysis, followed by Multivariate Analyses of Variance on activity budget data to examine the effect of people on bird behavior. We found that incubating birds on Sanibel flushed at significantly shorter distances from a person than did birds on La Costa; additionally, we found that Sanibel birds flushed at significantly greater distances from a dog than from a person. For time off nest, we found that birds remained off a nest for a significantly longer period of time following a flush by a dog than by a person; no difference between birds nesting on Sanibel and La Costa, however, was observed for time off nest. Brood reaction distance remained constant over the pre-fledged period and did not differ between broods that fledged and those that did not. We found that broods from La Costa reacted to human disturbance at greater distances than did broods on Sanibel. Additionally, human presence, regardless of activity type, resulted in altered behavior of Sanibel Snowy Plovers. In particular, running and foraging behaviors decreased, while walking increased. Beach driving vehicles also resulted in altered behavior of Sanibel Island broods. The presence of vehicles resulted in increased sitting and decreased standing. Variable response to human disturbance on Sanibel and La Costa Islands may result from differences in routine disturbance experienced by breeding birds.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
viii, 52 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Cara A. Faillace
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Faillace
NamePart (type = given)
Cara A.
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Cara Faillace
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ehrenfeld
NamePart (type = given)
David
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
David Ehrenfeld
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Morin
NamePart (type = given)
Peter J.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Peter J. Morin
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lockwood
NamePart (type = given)
Julie
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Julie Lockwood
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3FF3S5H
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Faillace
GivenName
Cara
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-07-14 14:38:53
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Cara Faillace
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Back to the top

Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
368640
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
1313b5055df101cdd9081d4f0a608e1a7f919d24
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021