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Understanding the effects of sand fence usage and the resulting landscape, landforms and vegetation patterns

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Understanding the effects of sand fence usage and the resulting landscape, landforms and vegetation patterns
SubTitle
a New Jersey example
Identifier
ETD_2803
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056359
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Geography
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Fences--New Jersey
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Geomorphology--New Jersey
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Sand dune ecology--New Jersey
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Coastal zone management--New Jersey
Abstract (type = abstract)
Sand fences are important human adjustments modifying the morphology of developed shores because they are inexpensive, easy to build and permitted seaward of dunes. The effects of sand fences on sediment transport and deposition in the early stage of their use are well known, but little is known about the significance of sand fences as instruments of landscape change and the effect of their late stages when they have deteriorated into weathered remnants and potential low scale barriers benefiting dune vegetation growth. This study identifies the role of sand fences in modifying coastal dunes. Effects of fence usage were evaluated in 29 municipalities of the developed coast of New Jersey over a 6-year period through a video inventory, interviews with municipal officers and field reconnaissance. Data on vegetation, topography and fence characteristics were gathered at four dune sites within Stone Harbor and Ocean City, New Jersey during September 2007 and March 2008. Variables include: vegetation diversity and density, distance of vegetation quadrat landward of dune toe, degree of sheltering, sediment deposition and erosion, presence of remnant fence, and distance of vegetation quadrat landward and seaward of fence. Results reveal that sand fence characteristics define the coastal landscape and communicate management goals which presently are not based on restoring landforms and habitats; use of fences can be made more compatible with natural processes and biota if careful consideration is given to their initial placement, sand fences remain visible when deployed at locations of low sediment transport; vegetation diversity does not increase near remnant fences but accretion caused by fences in the past may result in topographic diversity which benefits the development of specific vegetation communities.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xi, 107 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Rosana Grafals-Soto
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Grafals-Soto
NamePart (type = given)
Rosana
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
DisplayForm
Rosana Grafals-Soto
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Nordstrom
NamePart (type = given)
Karl F.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Karl F. Nordstrom
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Robinson
NamePart (type = given)
David A.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
David A. Robinson
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schneider
NamePart (type = given)
Laura
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Laura Schneider
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jackson
NamePart (type = given)
Nancy L.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Nancy L. Jackson
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3N29WQ8
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Grafals-Soto
GivenName
Rosana
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-08-09 12:12:29
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Rosana Grafals-Soto
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
2908160
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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